Response to the post “Filipinos Are Not Hispanic”

I stumbled upon this post by FIl-American Jon Torres over the popular site Associated Content. I would like to share my response to all my reader to some of his well intentioned subjects regarding his reaction as a Filipino to ‘being referred to as Hispanic’, something that is a common experience for those Filipinos who lives close to big Latino communities in the US. (All the italics are mine)

Filipinos Are Not Hispanic

A Few FAQ’s I Keep Having to Answer

By Jon Torres, published Mar 21, 2007

Yesterday I was making a remark to my friend about my Asian heritage and he replied, “Asian? But I thought you were Filipino!” I could only laugh (politely, of course) at his statement, not only because it sounded wrong, but also because I had heard it once too often. This cannot be dismissed away with some flippant remark I’m tempted to make, like “Don’t you ever wonder why there’s no Filipino food at Taco Bell? “

*This is quite common in the States, Filipinos – are being recognized as Hispanics, mainly because of the last name, facial feature & religion but Filipinos historically are Hispanics. Our Hispano culture makes us Hispanics. Mistake is made when hispanization is equated with blood relation and geography.

There seems to be an all-too prevalent belief among the many westerners I meet, which is the notion that Filipinos are Hispanic. While I can see (more or less) how this could be reasoned in a roundabout way, and make its own odd sense, it is nonetheless wrong. To someone who has grown up in the Philippines, it does sound plausible from a certain point of view, yet still very strange for a number of reasons. I will address some questions I frequently get asked on this apparently novel piece of information.

Where is the Philippines? According to Wikipedia ( as well as every single one of my social studies teachers) the Philippines is in Southeast Asia. At this point, I rather think this should end any further explanation. We are much, much closer to Taiwan, China, Japan, Indonesia and Singapore than any country in Europe or Latin America. The geographical neighborhood alone should clue you in to the probable ethnicity of the Filipinos. Perhaps it is simply this lack of awareness as to where the Philippines actually is, that causes many people to guess and consequently, make mistaken assumptions based on that.

___

Our location makes us Asian, but this does not undue our Hispanic roots for the simple reason that hispanization refers to history, language and culture. So if I were to answer the question “if Equatorial Guinea (an African nation) is a Hispanic nation?” my answer would be yes, not only because they speak Castilian but also because hispanization has taken root in their culture and society. Their geography, being a small state in the middle of the African wouldn’t nullify their identity. Same with ours and some of the pacific islands that were under Spain then.

If one is to travel to China, Japan or Thailand – a Filipino would almost immediately feel like in a different world, an alien, “Asia was never at home with us”, Nick Joaquin said and this is true, Manila is a city with little similarity with cities like Bangkok, Beijing and Tokyo etc etc – theirs is an oriental culture, ours is of Hispano origin. On the other hand, if you were to visit Mexico and all the other Latino countries – you would be awed how strikingly similar our culture is with them. So don’t be surprised if American’s see them in you.

___

How do you explain the 80% Catholicism, which is obviously from Spanish colonization of the Philippines? This is true. We were converted from mostly earth-based, ancestral worshipping spiritual beliefs, and baptized as Catholics in the 16th century. This was instrumental in Spain’s control over the Philippines for over three centuries as colonial property, by using organized religion along with political manipulation (without separation of Church and State). This had the effect of having Filipinos subservient to Spanish rule, without enjoying the benefits of being citizens. In short, we were the property of Spain, but we were not Spanish citizens.

___

Part of the reason why Americans looks at Filipinos as Hispanic is because of our religion. Most Asians are seen as Orientals in the US, Orientals for them practices Buddhism, Hindu or religions they see as unfamiliar and mystical. Since Filipinos are Asians in their mind, they would be surprised to see Filipinos practicing the religion of the immigrant Latinos.

Since hispanization is the process by which a place or a person absorbs characteristics of Hispanic society and culture. We are Hispanos more than asianos. Unfortunately, most are not aware of this fact.

“Property of Spain?” – I think this author never heard about the Cadiz constitution – anyway we were all subjects, under a monarchy that translates to citizenship. This is the reason why Filipinos with means then were able to study, live and travel abroad, they were Spanish by right. Could you imagine the Ilustrados, founding a liberal paper called La Solidaridad in the heart of Spain? If they were not protected by their right as Spanish citizens they could’ve been easily executed. In the days of the Yankees, anyone who stood up here and oppose them was blasted into oblivion, they only ceded leadership after they’ve been able to guarantee that they would still be in control, in terms of economic policies and the nations resources.

In the American years, it would be good to review that we never became citizens under their commonwealth, they never wanted us even with the noisy clamor of the federalistas. I’m sure all Filipino immigrants know that it is not an easy process to go there and work – this is how we were repaid. Our glorious stand with the Americans during WWII and all the service we render under their flag is all but forgotten now. While The Japanese and Germans, on the other hand, who fought against them, today, can freely travel in the US without being bothered by the process we usually face. Talk about history and how it is easily forgotten by this western power.

___

But don’t Filipinos speak Spanish? I get this question several times a year, almost on a monthly basis, and every time I want to say a resounding “No!”, they point out my own particular situation, because I happen to speak it passably well. In my case, as I believe is the same with many Filipinos living in the United States, I learned it here: both from Mexican friends and the local community college. The truth is, most Filipinos do not speak Spanish at all. Almost none of us do. From the 19th century American occupation, English has long replaced Spanish as the western lingua franca of the country, and has been for a hundred years.

___

We used to speak Castillan as a nation, but when the American’s came it slowly eroded but it is, as it was pointed out the ‘lingua franca’ back in the days. The American system then recognized literacy based on the use of the English language. Regardless whether you speak or write in Tagala or Castilian you would still be tagged as illiterate if you would neglect the use and study of this foreign language and since there is no way for someone to progress in the new American standard of education if one would not take up English, everyone had no choice but to learn it.

___

It certainly doesn’t help that Filipinos are generally adaptable, and being from a country with over a thousand local dialects, will be averse (or too polite!) to saying they do not understand, or are unable to learn a certain language. We eventually pick up enough of the local language to get by. True, our main dialect, like many others, is in fact peppered with Spanish words, making it fairly easy for us to learn Spanish if we tried. But what few Spanish words that we use in our daily colloquial speech are mostly pidginized and remarkably different from their original meanings (Get this: “leche” is a mild curse word in Tagalog!). Also, we have much more of the neighboring language groups in our vernacular: mostly Malaysian, Chinese, Arabic, and more recently, plenty of English.

___

It seems that the author of this failed to research on how many Spanish words there are in what most scholar’s claims as ‘pure’ tagala. Aside from thousands of Castilian words in the recognized national language, a study of the Spanish language would also highlight that some of the common words we use that we thought were ours were from the Castilian language. Adapted to suit local pronunciation.

I don’t even want to describe what “leche” means as a curse.🙂

___

Why do you have a Spanish last name? Doesn’t that mean you have at least one Spanish bloodline? A Spanish surname is very common among Filipinos, and this understandably can lead to confusion. It’s like meeting a Japanese person named Park, or more commonly, a Caucasian person named Lee. It however, does not reveal a person’s ancestry automatically. In the case of most Filipinos, the mass-conversion also led to our being relabeled with ‘Christian’ surnames. Genuine intermarrying was probably quite rare back then. I can confidently say that I am no more Hispanic than your roll of “Scotch” tape has been anywhere near Glasgow.

___

Your last name has nothing to do with your identity. You could be Chinese and possess a name like Juan de la Cruz but you would still be Chinese when you wake up in the morning not unless you got that name from the history and culture of your people – only then that it would mean something. Ancestry and places of origin does not define an identity. Again, there is confusion in the definition of nationality, location, ancestry and identity.

It was not just “relabeling” – it was in effect, creating identity for the natives the aside from of course the benefits it would provide the Government then.

They say, your name says a lot of things about you, this is true, a Hispanized name tells the history of adapting to the Spanish ideals of society then, as it was enforced by Claveria, the fact that it was accepted (voluntarily or involuntarily) means our ancestors assimilated into a Hispanic society.

These are ‘Christian’ names as he pointed out goes back to the process of hispanization. The one thing that the author failed to study is the process of becoming a “Filipino” . The review of this would bring one closer to our real identity. The author already mentioned the Catholic religion earlier, that’s Filipino identity along with the culture and heritage.

Some backward thinking folks would elect to go back to the old tribes for which I’d rather not, what we have, we should keep and respect.

___

So I hope it no longer seems to you a bold statement to say that Filipinos are not Hispanic, not from Latin America, do not speak Spanish nor are even of mostly Spanish ancestry. I encourage you to look up even more information on sites such as Wikipedia, and if possible, find some Filipino friends and raise a discussion, which I have no doubt will be a lively one. And have share some Filipino food while you’re talking. We like to think it’s better than Taco Bell, anyway.

___

I think everyone would be in agreement that our dish is the best in the world!

By the way, thanks to Jon for improving my calligraphy. I happen to take interest in this old art, his on line videos were awesome.

See it here



189 responses to “Response to the post “Filipinos Are Not Hispanic”

  • Singkil Filipinas

    Markwa, I’m ashamed of you.

    I might partly agree with your opinion about the Filipino identity, but you are so racist about Hispanics by equating them with drugs and illegal aliens. You basically assimilated the worst racist attitudes of Americans towards everything Hispanic or Latino. I have absolutely no sympathy towards you and your racism.

    You might have a Filipino/Malay DNA in you, but you speak and think like a racist American. You are a racist American at heart, you aren’t like the rest of us decent Filipinos. Are you a Donald Trump wannabe? Are you not content with your American citizenship or passport?

  • Anonymous

    If filipinos like to eat beans, chilly pepper, and corn tortillas, and some go to a catholic church. they are easily hispanics even if they dont speek spanish. Some mexicanas in remote areas dont speak spanish neather and even so are considered hispanics in USA. Filipinos resemble heavily latinamericans so they are easily Latinamericans also. And people burned from at least 1irs generation in mexico _white, brownish or black_ have asianoid eyes regardless their color. Im from Mexico.

  • De AnDA

    Did you just lost your job to a Latino? because you sure sound like one🙂 Don’t hate on the rest because you dislike some. There’s absolutely no need to insult people. You claim to be in the academia, you should know better. There’s a lot of good stuff in what you write, just skip the hate, otherwise I won’t post your comments. And I don’t want that – believe me.

    viva la rasa!😉

  • De AnDA

    You’ve hijacked this post with your comments Markuva! I disagree with you but man, the time you put into writing these comments deserves some appreciation.

    – Arnaldo

  • Markuva

    You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

    As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

    So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

    With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

    • I am Proud Filipino

      A lot of Filipinos are depriving themselves about their hispanic heritage. Our National heroes fought for the country named Filipinas, Most Filipinos do not know exactly their own history because they deprived the Spanish Language. Most of our History was actually written in this language. We became unified country because of this language before they created the National Language Tagalog or replace the Spanish in English during the American Occupation. Filipinos including the Indigenous native became SPANISH CITIZEN during 1812 from the Cadiz Constitution. That’s why our Illustrados like Rizal and other National Heroes who fought for our Independence was allowed to travel abroad. Mestizos, Spanish born in the Philippines and other natives united already even before our 1898 Independence. That’s why most of those important people in our history books belong to different ethnic group. Until June 12, 1898 when we became Independent then that’s the time we became FILIPINO CITIZEN as Independent Nation. So those who are Spanish born in the Philippines who fought for our Independence still chose to become Filipino Citizen which you still see up to now. But because of American Occupation, All Filipinos became STATELESS because they took the country & replace everything from the true name of the country ‘Filipinas’ to Anglicized ‘Philippines’, enforced English and dropped the used of Spanish. Now, we do not even understand the writings of our own heroes because we kept on hating it. Even the BAYAN KO which was a popular song during the ‘People’s Power’ was actually written in original Spanish Poem and he was a revolutionary leader who help Rizal editing the El Filibusterismo. He wrote that because of his criticism of Americans as traitor to the history but that part was dropped when it was translated in Tagalog. I guess we, Filipinos should learn to stop cursing our past and it’s better for us to understand our own history. We’re the one who should blame because we easily believe in everything that we read in the books without even digging on more details. Most important books of Filipino Nationalism was in Spanish Language like Apolinario Mabini.

      I care much of my National Identity and I still look up on my native Filipino ethnicity but I do know what is Filipino Identity. Hispanic Culture is a part of our Filipino Identity. If we kept on cursing our past, we will never make better for our future because past is a part of us of who we are now. Most Filipinos should know their history on how we became FILIPINO NATIONALS. I am proud Filipino and I won’t let anyone to delete of who I am.

  • Anonymous

    Omigod. This ridiculous topic again. I agree with the person who wrote this article. Filipinos are N-O-T Hispanic.

    I’ll post some of my posts that I wrote on another website here:

    You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

    As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

    So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

    With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Nvo Zang Okenve

    Only for those who can read Spanish:
    Soy de Guinea Ecuatorial y nosotros somos hispanos y africanos al mismo tiempo. No somos hispanos por la raza porque la mayoría somos Bantu, no tenemos sangre hispana. Pero tenemos una parte de cultura que es española. Al mismo tiempo nuestra cultura es africana en gran proporción, casi un 80%. Hablamos español y nuestros idomas africanos, al mismo tiempo, nuestro idioma oficial es el español por ahora, aunque existe el peligro de la “filipinización”, es decir, la pérdida de identidad lingüistica por razones económicas o políticas.
    A lo largo de la historia de las naciones, se va perteneciendo a varias identidades, sin solución de continuidad, pudiendo en ocasiones pertencer a varias identidades de forma simultanea, siendo ese el rasgo que le “identifica” precísamente y que podriamos llamar pluralismo identitario. En ese sentido, creo que Filipinas es Hispano y es asiático al mismo tiempo, siendo anglosajón en el idioma y en la construcción de sentencias o proposiciones lógicas y jurídicas.

    • Anonymous

      oohhh. I don’t read spanish but translation sites do. Regarding what you just said, there are some part I agree with, but I don’t know about your filipinzation theory. 25% of words in tagalog is spanish and the current filipino president Aquino is part spanish even if he looks a little bit more malay and chinese.

      • De AnDA

        Just saying that Filipino is the whole package of our historical experience. You can’t break it down nor pick what you fancy. Like home, you might not like how one of your parents raised you – your preference doesn’t change the fact the person’s a huge part of your being. Not sure if that made any sense🙂

        • Markuva

          You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

          As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

          So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

          With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Elizabeth

    And as for Filipino food being better than Taco Bell, I agree. So is Hispanic food! As I’m sure Chinese food is far better than the imitation you eat at cheap Chinese buffets. Also, Yusuke Komiya’s teacher is a bit cracked. How do you think you survive in a third world country if everyone who isn’t family can kiss your ass? You don’t!

    Hispanics are both feisty and warm. They make the best of friends and worst of enemies. Disrespecting any older person is a definite NO even if they’re not family and even if they have disrespected you. If you’re a man and a woman is getting her pursed snatched (young or old, family or not) you chase after the purse snatcher and take a beating or get the purse and give it back to her. You don’t call the cops. If they responded to every theft they wouldn’t be able to afford their gas money! Someone is getting attacked you personally defend them if you can, even if someone’s called the cops. And you always help old ladies cross the street, but not so much in North America where they can get angry and beat you with their purses. (happened to my dad)
    You always hold the door for a lady and perform various other signs of respect but not so much in North America where they can get angry and think you’re being sexist.
    And if you’ve barely enough food to feed your family and have a guest over, you serve them first and serve them seconds! You practically keep shoving food down their throats until they can’t take anymore because it’s not polite to reject food.
    Also, you have some serious work ethic because if you didn’t your children would starve. Even if they wouldn’t it’s kind of cultural. There’s nothing worse than someone who’s lazy, whose house is a complete mess, and who doesn’t eat your food. I think third world countries have some of the most interesting, amazing, and beautiful people.

    I don’t practice speaking for cultures of which I know nothing of. I think all cultures are amazing in how different they are and in how similar since we are all human.

    • De AnDA

      “You always hold the door for a lady and perform various other signs of respect but not so much in North America where they can get angry and think you’re being sexist” – Unfortunately, our society is becoming more like that of the Americans. I was riding a jeep a few days ago when a Lady, carrying a plastic bag and a large shoulder bag tried to get on the jeep while it had stopped temporarily near an intersection. Because the jeepney driver did not saw her, he started moving the vehicle. The Lady, barely inside (by this time, one of her feet was still on the estribo) was about to fall out (she could not hold on the bars since her hands were not free) So, I grabbed her forearm and attempted to take the plastic bags so she could hold on to the steel bars inside and get settled. When she finally got to sit, almost right across where I was, she did not look thankful at all. No, sir. In fact, she gave me this look that she didn’t want any help. It was strange. I had offered my seat on buses to ladies and old women, like what my parent’s had taught me, its very rare that these people acknowledges the gesture these days, on the contrary, most are irritated by it.

    • Markuva

      The joke about Taco Bell doesn’t seem to have been gotten by you. It was a joke about how “NOT HISPANIC” filipino blood is.

      There is no Filipino (quote unquote) food on the Taco Bell menu because the Philippines is not south of the North American Border. Filipino food is not Hispanic (if anything it’s malay / chinese / southeast asian) – – – – (we eat mung beans, mangosteen, jackfruit, durian, rambutan, avocados as dessert, coconut milk, lychees, longan . . . white jasmine rice, red rice, lugaw (rice porridge) . . . . we say “M-A-B-U-H-A-Y” and “S-A-L-A-M-A-T !!”

      We have muslim dances and culture, our language is 25% arabic / sanskrit.

      We don’t go around saying we’re Indian or Arab.

      Vietnamese don’t go around saying they’re F-R-E-N-C-H. French Colonized black nations don’t go around saying they have the same culture as Vietnamese. Indonesians don’t go around saying they’re Dutch or European.

      GIMME A BREAK !!!!!

      No amount of Ethnic Dysphoria is going to make a person from southeast asia HiSPANIC. Less than 3% of the Population of the Philippines has European or Hispanic blood.

      TACO BELL in relation to the Philippines and the question of Hispanica Insultica was a big fat obvious J-O-K-E.

      I got it. I loved it.

      Here’s more I wrote elsewhere on the same topic: I will repost here for emphasis:

      You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

      As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

      So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

      With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Elizabeth

    Exhibit A
    Costa Ricans are 82% white (as in Spanish/European etc mainly Spanish), only 15% Mestizos.
    The odd thing is no Spaniard would (ever) call him/herself Hispanic and vice versa. And yet Costa Ricans are labelled Hispanics, and they are, in that Hispanic is a cultural umbrella term.
    Exhibit B
    75% of Dominicans are actually mulatto. Guatemalans are 53% Amerindian 42% Mestizo and only 4% white (Spanish included). And yet they’re labelled Spanish or Hispanic. Argentina and Uruguay are 85% 88% white respectively with other races being minorities.

    Genetics can be thrown out the window! There are a lot of French/English speaking Islands over by the Caribbean. Does that make them French or English? Belize mainly speaks English. Are they English? There are labels that are country specific, race specific, language specific, culture specific, and some that are two or more. At the end of the day they’re just labels that will spark debates until the end of time. I think what makes Filipinos Filipinos is the sum of racial heritage, language, and significant cultural influence. No other people will have the same racial, linguistic, and cultural profile as the Filipinos. And cultural “contamination” is what cultures are made of since so few are pure so I’ll still be calling Filipinos Filipinos not Filipino Hispanic or Filipino Asian or any other term. There’s no need to see things in black and white and go on some sort of Hispanic mania or on the flip side not accept the Spanish heritage which has significantly contributed to the now FILIPINO heritage. People need to find middle ground.

    • Dan Diversity

      @Elizabeth..you have probably hit the nail on the head. Filipino should just be Filipino, Mexican should just be Mexican and so forth…

      The term “Asian, Hispanic etc..” was coined during the Nixon administration during the early 70’s. It was easier to group several nationalities based on ; 1) linguistic usage or 2) geographic location. It was a convenient way to take the U.S. census thus focusing on generic commonalities oppose to unique differences.

      At that time those who dwelled in the United States that primarily spoke “Spanish” as their mother tongue and/or emigrated from Latin America were mainly Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans. Thus, the popular coinage of “Hispanic and Latino” began. Significant amount of other Latin American nationalities emigrated during the 80’s, at the aftermath of the Central American revolutions, and the term Hispanic/Latino became intertwined and serves as an “ethnic” term based on the Spanish language and religious cultural patterns and a NOT racial term.

      In the same notion, the main “Asian” immigrants and/or descendants that lived in the the U.S. at the time were Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino. The common thread were their geographic location. Other “Asian” immigrants came in significant numbers after the Vietnam era. Thus popularized the term Asian as a racial term based on the similar biological features of China, Japan, and Korea.

      The problem with Asian being a racial term is that much of the Middle East and South Asia (India, Pakistan) are ALL located on the Asian continent, which people in the U.S. have no clue. In fact, in Great Britain, the term Asian refers to their people of Indian, Pakistani or Bengali descent.

      The problem with Filipinos “follows” (using that term loosely) cultural patterns of Spain after 300 plus years of Spanish colonialism and can be “considered” hispanic (but not necessarily “latino” based on its geographic location). Geographically it is in Southeast Asia neighboring China, Japan etc and was had the least amount of Spanish immigrants out of “all” the former Spanish colonies.

      It is a national identity “quandary” the Philippines face but there are more pressing issues to take care of such as POVERTY.

      People must realize, the term Hispanic/Latino and Asian are American coined terms based on their laziness to conjure up an easier way to take the U.S. census. BOTH terms are actually ETHNIC terms not RACIAL. Unfortunately, people look at both terms as racial, when there are only four races; Causicoid, Mongoloid, Negroid and Austroloid.

      You are correct, Filipino is just Filipino, Chinese is just Chinese, Mexican is just Mexican! GREAT post! Kudos to you!

      • Dan Diversity

        @Elizabeth…

        Brazil and the Philippines have similar “national identity” problems, particularly in the U.S..

        Brazilians are accepted as part of the “Latino” community but are not “Hispanic”…see the parity?

        Filipinos are accpeted as part of the “Asian” community, but share cultural practices and historical with their Hispanic counterparts and “theoretically” is part of the Hispanic world, but NOT part of the Latin American community.

        Which makes your statement that much more profound…Filipinos are Filipinos PERIOD! Hello?

        • Dan Diversity

          PSS…lol…

          Belize (or Belizians in the U.S.), located in the heart of Central America, therefore, located in the Latin American region (From Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America) is neither considered Latino OR Hispanic based it’s colonial ties with Great Britain! One cannot categorize them…

          You go girl!

    • Markuva

      You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

      As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

      So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

      With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Mark

    I think as the Spanish language is being reintroduce in the schools, this generation of Filipinos will decide…The world is their oyster!

    Some people simply hate the Spaniards based on what they have been taught in schools. True, we cannot erase the atrocities of colonization…but that was more than 100 years ago.

    This new generation of young Filipinos live in a totally different world where it is getting smaller. To embrace thier Hispanic heritage and past would be a plus in a globalized world…You cannot deny Filipinos being Asian, nor the fact that thier second language is English. This third component would make the country competitive and complete the plight of Filipino identity.

    • Markuva

      You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

      As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

      So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

      With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Lota Laughs

    A rich man was looking for a Filipina wife. Luckily, he found a Filipino man who happened to have 10 singles daughters. The rich man promptly went to this man’s house to ask one of his daughters as his bride.

    The man lined up his 10 daughters and proudly introduced them one by one; “This is Lita Lec Lec…this one is Sally Sec Sec…that one is Maria Mec Mec…

    Before he could finish introducing his lovely daughters, the Rich Man interupted and asked “DO YOU HAVE A DAUGHTER NAMED PEGGY?”

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

  • LaLeydeHerodes

    Let us not forget the truth. Filipinos do not speak Spanish, not unless your ancestors are Spaniards who intermarried or married another Spaniard then went on to carry the tradition of speaking Spanish at home or when among the so called “alta sociedad” They do not represent the general population and when they have to buy pandesal from the sari sari store they do have to speak Tagalog. In the Philippines, ONe does not learn Spanish from his parents (unless again your circumstances are like the aforementioned) and certaily one does not learn Spanish on the street. ONe has to study Spanish intensively in the Philippines in order to speak it. I do not hate Spain or their people, I do not see them as above or beneath me. They too were once under the rule of another group of people (Moors and Romansj) for a long time. One cannot deny that the Moors and the Romans left their marks in Spain just like they way the
    Spaniards left their marks in the Philippines

    • De AnDA

      @ LaLeydeHerodes – There are evidences that proves the existence of a larger number of Filipinos esp at the turn of the century that spoke Spanish. Maybe not as big as many Hispanistas would want it to be or not as small as Nationalist historians claims (which is 1% I think) but great enough to inspire a generation to launch a revolution using it as “the language”. The size and percentage for me matters little what’s important is the story behind why it was relegated as useless when the revolution that we all celebrate today made it as a tool to propagate their ideas and aspirations – ultimately, declare independence and write our constitution – in Spanish. Our research should be more on the underlying reason behind why it was deleted. We should examine the effects it had when it was removed by the Americans. Perhaps much of what we complain about the US started there.

    • Markuva

      B-R-A-V-O !!!!!!! B-R-A-V-O !!!!!! Agreed. Mabuhay Tagalog !!!

    • Markuva

      When I wrote BRAVO BRAVO – I was replying to the post by LaLedyHarodes above – not to the person directly above my 2 posts here.

  • migs

    to sum up Filipino culture in relation with Southeast Asia and Latin America,

    Filipino culture to Southeast Asia
    “So different, yet so similar.”

    Filipino culture to Latin America
    “So similar, yet so different.”

    Gets?

    • Observer

      Excellent analogy! Bravo

    • Markuva

      No. I don’t gets. Filipino to Latin America.

      Different. D-I-F-F-E-R-E-N-T. Why say otherwise?
      How do I feel about Hispanics?

      Why? Well, let’s hear how I really feel?

      :

      You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

      As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

      So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

      With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Raffy

    The identity of a Filipino is so multifaceted that the American race classification can classify them as Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander. I can give myself as an example.
    Even FIlipinos have numerous ethnic groups, like Kapampangans, Tagalogs, Visayans and many others.

    I agree with the comment of the forero named Spanish will return.

    I cannot claim to be a pure Filipino because of some foreign ancestry.
    My great-grandmother, who is possibly 1/8 Spanish, was the mother of my mom’s dad.
    Also, I have more recent Chinese ancestry due to some of my ancestors having a lot of business trips in the Philippines. My mom’s mom is possibly 3/8 or 1/4 Chinese while my dad is half-Chinese.
    My native Philippine blood consists of Ibanags, Ilokanos and Bikolanos.

    Alas, I cannot claim to speak Spanish well. Read the language, yes but speak it fluently, no.
    I’m much more fluent in English than I am with Tagalog or Cebuano.

    The ideal language for Filipinos to communicate with all Filipinos could have been Malay.
    Many Tagalistas can be very sensitive about revivlng Spanish as an official language and the widespread use of English. Also, they had a conflict with Visayans about the Cebuano language.

    We still need Spanish, alongside with English.

    • Markuva

      You can think you’re hispanic all you want – – – – but the Philippines isn’t Hispanic. Hispanics take up 90% of the American news for committing violent robberies, rapes, illegally entering the country, draining social services, etc.

      As far as the term “Filipino,” – it is a term for a quote unquote spaniard who was living in the conquered land renamed the Philippines in honor of Spanish royalty. The term Filipino doesn’t even apply to native peoples of the Philippines, which is why I always typed quote unquote whenever I referred to the Filipinos.

      So, I hope that Filipinos who are reading this support me – – – Take for example, the Coconut Craze that Americans are experiencing right now. Many puti americans who are educated think that coconuts come from Brazil. If you want to continue this H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C worship and fantasy, go ahead – – – – so that countries like Brazil can win the coconut competition and also get credit for it. The pop stars Rihanna (a black woman) and Madonna (who supports the Latin recognition of coconuts) – – will eclipse the fact that the Philippines and indonesia are the largest producers of coconuts – – and these celebs will make the world believe that coconuts are the food of black people (because Rihanna is a representative of a coconut water company) and Latinos.

      With the logic that this poster is using – – – Again, I’ve said this a million times, with this same logic, the Vietnamese are related to Northern Africans in culture. (No way, that won’t fly) – – – and Indonesians are Dutch. Gimme a break, talk about leaps in logic . . . No way. This is your chance, Philippines – get on the map and get the story straight. The Philippines is taking off the dirty cloak of their bloody colonial past. Nothing good comes from pretending to be who one is not, and we are not hispanic by blood or by any other delusional costume party, pretending to be spanish or hispanic. NO AMOUNT OF CLOTHING, VENEER, COSTUME, or PAINT will make the Philippines a South or Central American Nation. NO AMOUNT OF PAINT or DELUSION will make the Philippines Latino. Quote unquote Filipino people are hard-working. They are not lazy illegal aliens who commit violent crimes in the United States. We are not Hispanic and stop propagating such DISINFORMATION / DISSEMBLING / and BS Propaganda. HISPANICS commit heinous crimes, violent crimes, and enter the United States illegally by the millions. Education does not seem to be a top priority in Hispanic countries and there is nothing to be proud of by associating with Hispanics. Maraming SALAMAT, M-A-B-U-H-A-Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . pride in asian blood, malay blood, being southeast asian – – – and not having our coconut industry associated or beaten by any PR campaigns that make foreigners think coconuts are from another part of the world. Philippine Coconuts are not Coconuts from Hispanic origin – – – get it all right, and boost the country – be proud of your nationality, be proud of pure blood – – – LESS THAN 3% OF THE BLOOD OF FILIPINOS is Hispanic / European. THANK YOU. DO NOT LET OTHERS DELUSION CLOUD THESE “FACTS” –

  • Chinese YUK

    @TET…

    to answer your question…Yes, I’m a WHORE…and proud of it! LMAO….

  • nyor

    I live here in the philippines, I was born here and raised here. ever since i never considered myself as an asian. i am hispanic, my grandma is half-spanish, she is a Villarosa. my dad carries the name Pino like the others before him did. there fore i am hispanic because i have spanish blood running in m veins.

  • Adios Filipinas

    The new Philippine president, Ninoy Aquino, is the son of former president Corey Aquino.

    It was her administration that officially eliminated Spanish as an official language of the Philippines after almost 400 years.

    That said, kiss any revival of any Spanish renaissance returning to the Philippines.

    This dude is pro-Chinese! Too bad!

    • Kevin Bello

      Yeah, and speak the language of the Americans who shoved it into Filipino culture and forbade Spanish from being spoken, having already killed many Filipinos in a genocide, and bombed the city of Hispanic Filipinos in Intramuros…

      Espero que la hispanidad se vuelve a Filipinas finalmente, y que el castellano se vuelve de nuevo! Viva la hispanidad! Viva la Republica de Filipinas!

      • Spanish will return

        Spanish will be a spoken language in the Philippines in the near future. Even if only a small percentage is able to read, write and speak it (as a 3rd language).

        The foundation is set. 1) Selected schools are now offering it as a emphasized optional language of learning. 2) 500,000+ Chavacano speakers would easily option to replace English with Spanish as THEIR 3rd language. 3) Filipinos will rediscover their Hispanic roots and accept both the BAD and good of Spanish colonization. 4) Utilize English in diplomatic circumstances with Asia, N. America and Europe, Filipino/Tagalog as a continued National language, and Spanish to reconnect with Latin America and open new doors.

        The Philippines CANNOT develop fully as a nation until it embraces and heals its pain from it’s hispanic. past. Until then, it will always be dysfunctional.

        • Tet

          Right. re-learn Spanish language. Filipinos get out of America. Go to Mexico and South America or maybe Spain? if you are welcome their. They need maids, laundry women, etc.etc.
          Americans! lets party. Another group of Latinos want freedom from our money.

          • Markuva

            I’m trying to convince people of the same thing: hispanics take up the entire News for violent crimes: rape, robbery, assault, battery, martinez, jimenez, hernandez, guttierrez, ramirez . . . who would want to associate with such violent uneducated people? Thank you for reinforcing this. Keep the comments. Scrawny southeast asian people need to realize how rough hispanics are. They don’t get it.

        • LaLeydeHerodes

          Spain did fully develop as a nation without having to speak the language of its former colonizers. Two nations (I know of) colonized Spain before it became a global power. England was also under the Romans but even though both English and Spanish are closely related to Latin both are distinctively languages on their own. Latin (the language of its former colonizer, the Romans) might have been the lingua franca in England at one time but it was still a global power when Latin was no longer in use. We are not talking about global power for the Philippines (feed its people first) . What I am saying is that Spain and England developed without its colonizers’ language. I do not fault Spain (that nation whose language you are saying we must speak too) for not having adopted the language of its former colonizers but look Spain did well.

        • Markuva

          Tell that to the Germans. Tell them (i keep trying to reply to the person that said we have to connect with a hispanic past) that they have to reconnect with the Nazis.

          Your logic is as flawed as the idea of embracing evil. Puhleeze. Are you retarded? Seriously.

        • Markuva

          My post above was to the “Spanish Will Return” poster –

      • Tet

        Good! what you could do is correspond to Hispanic people, reconnect, South Americans, Mexican, Central Americans. Go ahead, I’m sure you will always be happy with them your own kind.

        • Markuva

          Hahaha. I totally get your point. Any Hispanic country would eat a scrawny little southeast asian alive. Here in the US the Mexican illegals alone are always in the news. Every 5 minutes you’ll hear the names: Ramirez, Gonzalez, Hernandez, Martinez, Guttierrez, Sanchez . . . . violent crime this, heinous crime this, assault, robbery, rape, murder . . . always always a Hispanic. I don’t want this for any of my southeast asian kin folk. Entiendes? Hahahaha. Ay Caramba !!!!

    • Tet

      The Cojuangcos are Chinese (by heart and soul)

      • Pepe Alas

        The Cojuangcos are DEFINITELY not Chinese, especially not by heart and soul. The more correct description is that they are of Chinese origin. The Cojuangcos of today are Filipinos, period.

  • Juan Ladz

    Insecure and ignorant people are the one’s who have big mouth. you guys need to stop this Philippines thing! its not good for everyone of you. you guys need to move on.

    i know this is kinda off the subject but i have my point, have you notice politician and big people always shut their mouth because they know better. (they don’t share what they know)

    i should be a politician….hahahaha

    • jackelita

      ok go ahead….. politicians are more ignorant & they shut their big mouths because they know nothing but blaming & exchanging harsh words, hahahaha😀

  • De AnDA

    @ Jackelita – Thanks for dropping by. We have the longest Christmas celebration in the world, believe it or not, and it officially ends with the first Sunday of the first month of the year – Epiphany day/Día de Los Tres Reyes Magos.

    • jackelita

      @ De AnDA – Yes its true that Filipinos acknowledge that day being the end of Christmas but don’t celebrate it the way Hispanics do. Also this is just one example, there’s more. The music is more American & Asian, folk dances are more Asian, popular foods like pancit, siopao, siomai & lumpia are obviously Asian, they way you address your older brothers & sisters are definitiely Asian, the stilt nipa huts & rice fields are Asian & many many more. There are Spanish influences that’s why you see some similarities b/w Filipino & Hispanic but for the most part linguistically, culturally & genetically, Filipinos are more Asian. I have both Filipino & Hispanic friends & from my observation of these 2 groups, there many differences.

      • Juan Ladz

        I was born in Cebu, Philippines. my family and i migrated here in california 15 years ago all i can say is that when your talking about philippines you have to look at which part of philippines you are talking about because each region have different customs, tradition and what not. like i was born in the visayaz region (region 7) and i can tell you that pancit is not our popular food those are chinese foods that they passed on when they migrated to the philippines. escabeche, menudo, afritada and lechon and the pig intestines are most popular in cebu. in my household back in the philippines our popular food is embutido and we don’t live in a hut.

        All i can i say is that im proud and love my filipino culture.

        Philippines are rich of diverse culture influences and i am proud of it because it doesnt belong to any category and it makes people have something to talk about and that makes you popular!

        ” if your talked about , youre doing something good”

        Philippines is Philippines it doesnt belong to any group its Independent. (truth doesnt need proof)
        Period. ( i should run for president….. hmmmm)

      • Markuva

        Here here !!!! Bravo !!!!! Mabuhay !!!!! Filipinos are not hispanic ethnically, geographically, or culturally (reject this barrio fiesta BS).

        Why would we want to downgrade (see the rest of my comments)? I just wanted to commend your post. Thank you. Mabuhay !!! Salamat !!!

  • Marco

    Hola a todos. Soy español, concretamente de Canarias, y me gustaría aportar mis comentarios a este foro que me parece muy interesante.

    En primer lugar creo que la conexion cultural y de identidad de Filipinas con Mexico es incuestionable. Creo que la mayoria de los filipinos se sentirían como extraños visitando China, Japón, Corea o Indonesia. No tienen nada que ver con estos paises. Si visitaran Mexico y observaran sus costumbres y la forma de ser de su gente observarían una gran similitud. Por lo tanto creo que los filipinos son hispanos aunque esten geograficamente en Asia y el español no sea la lengua del pueblo.

    Por otro lado me parece que todavía no se ha superado el resentimiento hacia la etapa colonial española. Lo cual me sorprende puesto que todos los paises de hispanoamerica ya lo han superado y sobre todo porque la etapa colonial yanki fue mucho mas sangrienta que la española… Alguien podría decir: “es que los yankis nos dieron educación y sanidad a todos los filipinos, no como los españoles” lo cual es cierto, pero no deja de ser menos cierto que eso mismo es lo que pretendian dar a todo el pueblo la elite cultural filipina que proclamo la independencia de Filipinas y que fue masacrada por los yankis.

    Saludos.

    • jackelita

      porke los yankis habian lavado el celebro a los filipinos y eso los nativos ha pensaban ke los españoles no echo nada bueno durante el reino hispano mientras al mismo tiempo adoran todas las cosas americanas. pero no creo ke los filipinos son hispanos porke la mayoria d eyos son d ascendencia malaya y solo menos ke 3% tienen sangre español. aunke hay unas influencias espanola en la cultura filipina pero sigue siendo predominantemente asiatico. la mayoria d los filipinos no hablan ni entiende castellano aparte d las palabras castellanos d prestamo.

      • Kevin Bello

        Lo siento si mi español es demasiado básico a usted, pero creo que los filipinos son hispanos… recuerda que el idioma castellano se vuelve de nuevo a las escuelas secundarias en Filipinas a la influencia de la expresidenta Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, y a través del Instituto Cervantes, una escuela que se dedicha al enseñar el castellano a los filipinos.

        Si ve la página de Wikipedia sobre la hispanidad o el panhispanismo, descrubrirá que las Filipinas es una parte del club hispánico, y éso es fuertemente innegable. Nuestros héroes nacionales como José Rizal escribió casi solamente en español. La primera constitución de Filipinas y otros papeles del gobierno era en el castellano, y era la lingua franca del país hasta los americanos cambiaron todos al inglés y han prohibido el castellano de las islas. En cultura, tradiciones, comidas, religion, danzas, música tradicional, idiomas (el chavacano está vivo y bien hablado), hay mucho, mucho de influencia española.

        La identidad hispánica es compartida por la gente mundial, como en Guinea Ecuatorial, a las Filipinas.

        • Anonymous

          people like jackelita are so stubborn. it has been said that the term ‘hispanic’ refers to culture, not necessarily genetics. although the majority of the inhabitants of the philippine islands are of malay origin, their customs and language and history are full of hispanic elements. these won’t go away soon.. Filioinos continue to celebrate the birth and death anniversaries of the very hispanic jose rizal.

          • Markuva

            why do you so badly want to be mexican, honduran, salvadorean, … hispanic trash and fodder for the TV news crime blog? hispanic culture is nothing to strive for. why do you want to drag a culture and race of people into the b-a-s-u-r-a hispanica? hispanic culture is a trashy culture – as viewed by many cultures of the world – – and as portrayed by the TV news media and crime…

    • Markuva

      Wow. What did you say? No entiendo, Hispanico Don Jose Conquistador. (by choice – rejected. as in phew! phew!)

      Ako ay Pilipino, no hay nada basura hispanica.

      This is not to be insulting, this is to be as ridiculous as the notion of scrawny little southeast asian men being or trying to be macho hispanico. No No Sorry Sorry.

  • Not Asian

    i don’t want to sound juvenille, but the reason why many filipino americans don’t like the term asian is because, in the u.s.;

    asian = chinese = small penises, unattractive people, flat chested and flat faced women, men that has no sex appeal, ruthless and money hungry, no social skills (burping, scratching in public), hygiened challenged (uncombed hair, unbrushed teeth, unbathed..) BUT intelligent, business-minded (borders idolatry), regards education highly.

    • Akó si Gundam

      The word “ASIAN” itself sounds Chinese. HWAAACHAAAA!!!!!!

    • jackelita

      Well its just the same as w/ the case of Hispanics being termed as Mexican, illegal, lazy, gang members, uneducated, housekeeper etc. BUT family-oriented, religious, sexy & pretty.

      I don’t want to sound racist here but I think you Americans need to do your homework, conduct a more in-depth research & actually live in Asian & Hispanic countries so in that way you won’t be sound too stupid & irritating when identifying such an ethnicity.

      Being of both Hispanic (Spanish-Mexican) & Asian (Filipino) lineage honestly I’m very much offended by how you Americans perceived us. I’m 1/4 Asian & 3/4 Hispanic but I would find it too insulting if you thought it as if I’m Mexican-Chinese.

      • jackelita

        P.S. You might wondering coz on my earlier post I didn’t mention I got Mexican blood. See both my grandparents origins were from Spain but one of them (my maternal grandpa) was a son of a Spanish-Mexican criollo couple who migrated to Phils from Mexico. Just found this one out recently.

        • Markuva

          So what’s your point? If you’re Mexican then clearly – “clearly plain as day” – you’re Hispanic. So, the discussion is over. You’re Mexican. There’s no debate as far as you’re concerned, so getting back to the debate now . . . you can stay out – really. This debate doesn’t concern you. Less than 3% of the Philippine population (that country that’s located in southeast asia) is european hispanic etc. K? There’s a debate here – being that clearly you’re Hispanic is not controversial. Thanks for letting the world know you’re mexican. Most of us don’t want any association. Not to be racist, but so many oh so many people in the Philippines are racist and do not want to be Hispanic (they think they want to be but I don’t think they have a clue what real Hispanic society is. It’s like middle class white kids wanting to be gangsta. You get what I mean? Filipinos are skinny and scrawny and wanna-be machismo.

          So, please let this debate up to the people who consider ourselves malay / southeast asian, k? Thanks. I was trying to be nice.

      • De AnDA

        @Jacklita – Rizal felt insulted when people would see him as chinese or japanese🙂 a lil’ more research and you’ll understand what Filipino wre historically – of course today is a different story…

    • Pakindia

      LOL…this is WRONG…however it is funny! Do Chinese guys really have small penises? Isn’t that just a myth?

    • Markuva

      That’s exactly why Filipino men want to feel “M-A-C-H-O” as in their dreams they’re macho hispanico delusiono. This is simply not the case. Filipino men can barely grow hair. We are tiny little southeast asian people / malay race / related to southern taiwanese indigenous ami people. No amount of drugs, paint, language, delusion is going to make a filipino latin american like they are in central and south america (scary. violent. always in the news. always trying to live illegally in the us. draining social services. ruining neighborhoods. guttierrez, ramirez, martinez, hernandez, sanchez, . . . violence violence violence. scary. nuff said. Delusion. Fantasy for Imagined machismo. Hispanics are the antithesis of us peaceful, not on the news every 5 minutes for violent crime, peace and job keeping peaceful people of southeast geographical, cultural, and ethnic origin.

  • Rep Utation

    Thank You De Anda,

    I’m 2nd generation American of Filipno descent…don’t speak tagalog nor do I speak Spanish.

    I do however, have numerous friends that are also 2nd generation “Hispanic” and “Asian (Chinese, Japanese and Korean). Most, if not all, don’t even speak Spanish or Chinese, Japanese or Korean.

    Through the American culture and usage of ENGLISH, even Americans of Filipno descent have much more understanding of one another with Hispanic-Americans than they do with Asian-Americans.

    This has been MY experience.

    .

    • Markuva

      If you live in economically depressed areas in the United States, it seems to be my experience that you’ll find more cameraderie with latinos and gang-bangers. (I have seen this gangsta attitude in da hood. LOL. In the rare instances that I’ve had to take a bus or dirty public transportation)

      Some people who grew up upper middle class with the kids who had doctor and lawyer parents, and whose father went to west point in the 50s, attended a top 10 university, went to professional school and lived a decent life would tell you that the only reason you feel an affinity for latinos, chicanos, blacks, hip hoppers, gang bangers etc. is because you grew up economically depressed and lost your way . . .

      This is not an ethnic phenomenon that you experieced. This was a social experiment you experienced. Filipinos are southeast asian. We eat rice and mung beans. We eat rice porridge. Many of us keep our heads down and respect our manong and manangs. We have short and small frames.

      I’m sorry you got lost in the economic shuffle, but your only culture seems to be P-O-O-R and blacks and hispanics dwell in this area. Don’t confuse socio-economic status with ethnic culture. I’m glad you turned Hispanic. Sounds like you made the right choice for you. In San Francisco many people change their genders. I guess you’re entitled to change your ethnicity and culture too. Dysphoria has a cure – it’s called surgery. It’s called Denial. Good Luck !!!

  • De AnDA

    @rep utation – Thanks for your comments. In order to solve the riddles of Filipino historiography, we must first define the meaning of the Filipino historically. By this I mean how the term came about as this helps us understand the reasons for the original definition. Anyone today can claim they’re Filipinos but how did we start to call a Filipino, a Filipino? Clearly, we’re not Filipinos because of our geographic location or our asian character and features. Identity is something that goes beyond this conceptualization. Its how you look at yourself compared with the others. Asia was never at home with us, just go to China or Japan and you would feel alien, but be in say Mexico and you’ll suddenly understand this hispanic connection.

    • Rep Utation

      Having lived in Southern California all my life, I totally agree with your take. All one has to do is to take visiting Filipino relatives to San Diego, and visit Tijuana for ONE day…

      In fact, a grandmother told me, that upon arriving to the U.S. in 1964, San Diego in particular, she was homesick of her native Philippines. A family friend, during Christmas, happened to have taken her to Tijuana for the day. She was amazed to see the parade of saints, lights, atmosphere and outdoor markets that she purchased chicharones, sinkamas and flan….items that were NOT main stream in 1964. And get this…she’s 100% Ilocano!

      It’s things like that Filipinos from the Philippines have NO CLUE!

      I agree, it’s what’s already built-in that I see that Hispanic culture is imbreaded. Most just see the geographic location, and the excellent reputation that Chinese, Japanese and Koreans have forged in the U.S. and have Filipinos “piggy-back” on that…It’s comical really!

      • Rep Utation

        Note:

        (Town celebrations at Christmas and Easter are almost identical in both the Philippines and Mexico)

        (sinkimas = jicama)

        • Markuva

          I think the nexus that you seem to be swimming euphorically and rejoicing in is “p-o-v-e-r-t-y” and catholicism. the person who posted that they’re both “third world catholic countries,” is correct. When people are poor – you really can’t tell much of a difference between the po white trash and the N-words.

          Poor is poor, and what you’re rejoicing in as being similarities is “po” and “gullible” << these have equivalents the world over, so don't rejoice so much, because what yo u're being jubilant about isn't a happy topic.

          Race – – don't offend people and their race – the fake religiosity and poverty are all superficial. Don't confuse race with this Tijuana BS – you won't find patis or bagoong in TJ . . . but you will find tequila poppers.

          Don't be ridiculous mexican wannabe.

      • latinaDE_VERDAD

        they are both catholic third world countries.

    • Yusuke Komiya

      “Asia was never at home with us, just go to China or Japan and you would feel alien, but be in say Mexico and you’ll suddenly understand this Hispanic connection.”

      The connection with Mexico is only skin deep. Our traditions and customs may seem similar but when it comes down to our values that is another story. My parents, who were both raised in Manila, lived in Japan for 10 years in their 30’s and it was not as “alien” as you make it out to be. My mother really connected with the Japanese because of the similar values we share. Respect towards elders, filial piety, hard work ethic, group-oriented, and respect towards others (as to prevent conflict and potential lost of face on both parties), reserved and hospitable. Hispanics may be family-oriented but it just stops at the family. Everyone else, unless they really need their help, can personally kiss their ass for all they care (this was explained to me by my Spanish teacher). They tend to be very fresh and tactless sometimes, even with strangers. Now despite these things I cannot deny the Hispanic heritage of the Philippines. Just as you sir shouldn’t deny that the only connection we have with Asia is geography when most of our archipelago’s past is based around Asia. Our Indian and Chinese influence while not exactly dominant is visible if you look. We belong to both worlds yet in some ways we don’t but that’s how it is for a country like ours with multiple influences. Nonetheless I find offense in your comment about Asia for at the end of the day it was our original home and one that we should look into as well while we try to connect back with our Hispanic roots.

      • De AnDA

        @ Yusuke Komiya – I could understand your point if maybe it was lets say less based on few traits that are universal. Values and beliefs are interwoven but the culture that is closes to you today is that of Filipino Hispano. You remove your connection to it and you would no longer recognize yourself as a “Filipino”. Let say we succeed in removing everything “hispanic”, by then, we could fully claim that ours, the tradition and culture, truly asian. This would be our condition if those Spaniards never came.

        • Markuva

          wow, you’re on the BS wonderdrug De Anda. Philippines without the “hispano” < is that a word

          would look just like the southern Philippines – – –

          Don't be an agent of colonial propaganda. Wash your head out with soap. Puhleeze.

          Puhleeze.

          A Philippines without spicaspanics would look just fine. It would look like the southern Philppines, salamat, mabuhay !!!!! Go Philippine Sultanate, Go !!!! Support to you !!!!

    • Markuva

      Somehow you managed to skip an entire region and go straight to Mexico. Why?

      What about inserting the paragraph: But if you go to Malaysia or Thailand or Indonesia . . . . a filipino will be right at home.

      However, if a Filipino goes to Mexico, he’ll end up a) knifed b) robbed c) butt raped d) called Chinga Chino e) made fun of f) will be searching for white rice for days on end g) will be searching for rambutan, mangosteen, lychee, longan, dragonfruit, jackfruit h) wonder why everyone is so darned dumb as !@#$ i) did I say he’ll be searching for some wonderful sticky jasmine rice for days j) will be missing his lumpia k) will not be able to digest pinto beans and burritos l) will be farting his guts up m) ….. n)……. o)….. you get the picture, ese. z) will not be able to handle tequila wtf???

  • Like Duh

    Can Jon Torres then explain Mexico. Is Mexico;

    1) a Latin American (cultural) country or

    2) a North American (geographic) country or

    3) or both?

    If #3 is your answer, then why is it so difficult to understand the situation of the Philippines?

    • Markuva

      dude, duh . . . . durrrr . . .

      YES – Mexico is in Central America (as in “south of the border” just like Brazil)

      These are Hispanic Countries.

      Buy a globe. I’m sure a social worker will drop one off for you – free of charge. Alms for the retarded . . . duh

  • Rep Utation

    Jon Torres “glib” remark stating “..the Philippines is located in Southeast Asia…” thereby using its geographic location as a foundation to the argument that Filipinos are Asian. Then please explain;

    1) Brazil. Are they Latinos? Hispanics?

    2) Belize in Central America?

    3) Guyana in South America?

    4) Lybia, Morocco, Egypt, Algeria…they are on the continent of Africa, but are they AFRICAN?

    5) 3/4 of Russia is on the continent of Asia. White Russians who were born in Siberia or along the Chinese border…are they Asian or European?

    The argument of Filipinos being “Asian” because of its location is very, very weak.

    • filipino

      first of all what I really hate is when non-filipinos speak so confidently about filipinos when they know nothing really about filipinos other then generalizations

      filipinos are not just asian geographically..but racially as well….its in our DNA….only 3% of filipinos have spanish/ european ancestry at all….most filipinos could basically pass for malay, indonesian, thai, cambodian, burmese, or lao…..filipinos had a culture before the spanish bullshit…filipino culture today is not just spanish…but a fusion of native asian values and christian culture…but the asian values that many filipinos hold is what seperates us from hispanic culture…filipino culture is shaped by many cultures malay/ indonesian/ spanish/ chinese/ americans

      religious wise I can relate to catholic dominant countries because of our common religion…catholicism

      but race wise and everything…I relate to SEAsians more….I don’t know a word of spanish or give a damn about it…but I am amused how Bahasa Malay or Indonesian sounds so similar to filipino

      • Pakindia

        In Great Britain, the term Asian = South Asians = Indians, Pakistani’s and Bengalis… Oriental = East Asia.

        The term ASIAN is NOT a race…Get your facts straight sweetie !

        • Pakindia

          Causicoid, Mongoloid, Negroid, and Austroloid are the thre main anthropological RACES.

          There is a difference between RACE, Ethnicity and Nationality.

          The term Asian and Hispanic , in the U.S., was a lazy way of conveneintly grouping REGIONAL peoples.

          Egypt, Lybia, Algeria and Tunisia are located on the African continent…would you consider them African? Their race is CAUSICOID, thier ehtnicity is Middle Eastern, and their nationalities are Egyptian, Lybian, Algerian and Tunisian.

          Too many damn Filipinos intertwine RACE, Ehtnicity and Nationality thinking they are all one and the same. RACE = Mongoloid, Ehtnicity= EAST Asian, Nationality = Filipino!

          Thank you very much!

        • Markuva

          Hey Pakindia – who the eff cares. I get the point – and what is a Paki Indian doing making comments on a Filipino thread. Get your categories straight, “sweetie” – go comment on an india paki board. RACE: MALAY call the people who live in the philippines or who are of quote unquote philippine descent whatever you want, but be accurate and don’t so far off a cliff into left field and refer to someone from there as Hispanic – only idiots want that. Ok, “SWEETIE?” Pakiland – isn’t that somewhere outside of the Philippines (squint – so why are you posting here?

      • Markuva

        Wow Filipino – thanks for your post. What you wrote sounded like something I would write (albeit nicer).

        Thank you – – – What has gotten into these people? What?

        Stockholm Syndrome is what.

    • LaLeydeHerodes

      So how do I consider myself when I do not even have any feature that resembles that of someone with Spanish genes. Do the Spaniards by the way call themselves Arabics because they were ruled much longer by the Arab speaking Moors?

      • Pepe

        In a historical sense, if you do not speak Spanish and you are not Catholic, you are merely a Filipino/a by virtue of citizenship. Nothing more nothing less.

        To be a complete Filipino/a, you have to be a Catholic (whether you like it or not). And you have to be Spanish-speaking. If you do not have those attributes, then you are just a half-baked Filipino/a.

        Again, this is all based on an impartial historical and scientific analysis.

        As they always say, “the truth hurts”…

        Best regards.

        • LaLeydeHerodes

          Does that mean the majority of Filipinos are merely Filipinos by virtue of citizenships? Try speaking Spanish to everyone in the Philippines, How about the Filipinos who are not Catholics, should they be looked down as less valuable people because they are not full Filipinos. Show me where these two conditions (Catholic and Spanish speaking) are written in the Phillipine constitution. How many people should be hurting right now because they are living not according to your standard of a true Filipino. As they always say, “the truth hurts”, but whose truth is it , yours or everyone else’s?

          • Pepe

            “Does that mean the majority of Filipinos are merely Filipinos by virtue of citizenships?”

            Exactly.

            “Try speaking Spanish to everyone in the Philippines”

            Hahaha! Why should I? I already know the results. But if you want to get sarcastic with me, OK, I’ll play along… Speaking Spanish to everyone in the Philippines? That’s a huge effort. So fund my travels first, and I will gladly do it for you.😀

            “How about the Filipinos who are not Catholics, should they be looked down as less valuable people because they are not full Filipinos”

            Hey, “looked down” and “less valuable” are your words, not mine.

            “Show me where these two conditions (Catholic and Spanish speaking) are written in the Phillipine constitution.”

            Sorry, but I do not have an ounce of respect anymore towards your US-WASP-sponsored Constitution. It really has to be amended, if not used as toilet paper.

            “How many people should be hurting right now because they are living not according to your standard of a true Filipino.”

            They are not hurting, no doubt about that. They were made apathetic towards the situation. And that is what me and a few friends of mine are struggling to change. It’s an uphill battle, yes. And you’re probably laughing it off. But that won’t faze us one bit. it’s something that we enjoy. It’s something that fulfills us. Because we know we are fighting the good fight.

            “As they always say, “the truth hurts”, but whose truth is it , yours or everyone else’s?”

            By the way, you also said that Filipinos are not living according to my standards. Excuse me. Those are not my standards. I am merely speaking from a historical perspective. Didn’t you read what I wrote above? “…this is all based on an impartial historical and scientific analysis.”

            Keep it coming.

            • LaLeydeHerodes

              You need to know that the Spaniards were under the Arab speaking Islamic Moors for 700 years that is more than twice the colonization of Philippines by Spain. Going by your logic (a Filipino is only a Filipino by virtue of citizenship if he/she does not speak Spanish and is not a Catholic) a Spaniard is only a Spaniard by virtue of citizenship if she/he does not speak in Arabic and is not an Islam. That is not my logic but yours. A Filipino does not have to speak Spanish and certainly does not have to be a Catholic to be a true Filoipino. We are talking about the truth not ANGER that is in your heart. Catholic religion does not foster anger.

              • Pepe

                That is the odd thing, LaLeydeHerodes. Although much of Spain was conquered by the Moors, they were not thoroughly and wholly Islamized. But the Muslims themselves were to blame for it; they permitted many Iberians to practice their Christianity (were required to pay a special tax and to be subject to certain discriminations). Unlike in our case, so little of our indigenous past can be seen today. So it is thus incorrect (if not illogical) to compare what happened to Spain to our country’s Spanish past.

                By the way, the Philippines was not exactly colonized by Spain. The Spanish context of colonization or colonialism is far different from that in English. It’s a long story. And I’ll write about it soon. You’ll be one of the first people to know about it (if you’re interested).

                Anger? Who’s angry? LOL! Bacá icáw, ¡haha! Ang sayá-sayá co ngâ, eh.😀 You missed what I wrote again: “…it’s something that we enjoy…” If there is anger in my heart, then I won’t enjoy this stuff that I’m doing right now. Icáw talagá, nang-iintriga pa…😀

                Regards.

          • De AnDA

            @ LaLeyHerodes – Historically, yes. Refer to Chinese and Japanese converts of the so called Manila “ghetto” during the Spanish era. But we are looking at a wide window here, the duration by which the Spaniards administered the islands was quite long, more than 300 years, so putting everything down as if it was just one single event won’t do Filipino history justice. If you try speaking Spanish, say in 1910’s and you would feel at home but now, no, we’ve lost that. Good day to you.

        • Markuva

          Pepe – someone sold you a colonial cocktail and gave you a stupid person infusion. Sorry guy, truth hurts . . . why are you insulting that person who had a very valid point. I agree with her. What is all of this Hispano Mania? Mexican Nicaraguan Venezuelan wanna-bes out there piggy backing on the Latino Crime Wave because Hispanic / Latinos take up so much of the 5 o ‘ clock news for rape, robbery, battery, drugs, etc…. ? Truth Hurts Pepe. What’s with that wetback name? You’re Mexican, dude. You’re not Filipino at all. If you were, you’d have a name like Dodong or Bong Bong. Go back to Mexico.

  • Rep Utation

    The geographic location of the Philippines – Asia, and its 333 years of Spanish colonization leaves the nation in an “identity quandary”.

    On one hand, the popular and most accepted view is the definition of Hispanic is the usage of the Spanish language and of course the actual biological features that includes the direct descendance of the blood-line..

    On the other hand, one views Hispanic as a cultural entity that includes “all” former Spanish colonies and attempts to unify the 23 nations collectivively attempting to forge a global “Pan-HIspanic” federation similar to the British Commonwealth of Nations. In this case, the common bond would not be language or biological features, but built on the unifying factor of Spanish colonialism.

    However, most Filipinos are influenced by a 3rd factor, and probably the most powerful. That is the realistic factors that define “all” the Spanish speaking nations today.

    When compared to the Asian region that includes: China, Japan, India, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong-Kong, Taiwan and Korea, none of the Spanish speaking nations have accompllished any technical advancements, political and military respect, educational progress for its masses, and economic and political stability over the last 50 years.

    If a developing 3rd world country has the ability to choose an affiliation, which the Philippines does, it doesn’t take a genius to see which one the populace would gravitate to…despite its location.

    • jackelita

      @ Rep Utation: “When compared to the Asian region that includes: China, Japan, India, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong-Kong, Taiwan and Korea, none of the Spanish speaking nations have accompllished any technical advancements, political and military respect, educational progress for its masses, and economic and political stability over the last 50 years.” Excuse me but you fail to mention the poor asian countries like sri lanka, bangladesh, cambodia, myanmar, laos & countries like vietnam, indonesia, thailand, malaysia are still a developing nation & don’t have that kind of technical advancement. FYI, mexico & brazil are among the world’s fastest emerging markets today alongside india & china. in addition mexico has their own high performance sport automobile called Mastretta MXT produced by their own car maker Mastretta, so how could you say there no advancement ?

  • Asians Will Rule Soon

    Remember…English is an official language in India, Malaysia, Hong-Kong, Sri Lanka, the Philippines and Singapore.

    It is agressively being taught in China, Japan and Korea.

    Spanish speakers will no longer find any jobs in the United States…They will HAVE to learn English (IN Latin America) to go to work in Asia…

    That’s the way of the world sweethearts!

  • Asians Will Rule Soon

    Any way you look at it, it will be the English language that will the lingua-franca of Asia…not Spanish. Filipinos don’t have to learn Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Korean (though it is good to do so) but ENGLISH will be the bond that will create a Pan-Asian confederation…albeit a 2nd language to many people in East and South Asia.

    If the Hispanics want the “Spanish” language or even the Hispanic culture on the global radar, they had better embrace the Philippines.

  • Asians Will Rule Soon

    P.S.

    sorry…last line I meant to say;

    “…while using the English language to communicate with the nations they desire to conquer.”

    My thoughts were faster than my typing…lol..

  • Asians Will Rule Soon

    The term “Latino” or “Hispanic” was created by North American politicians and census takers that conveniently grouped Spanish speakers who refused to identify themselves as “Black” or Indegenous/Indian. The common denominator was the Spanish language within an Anglophone majority..

    On the otherhand, Filipinos, (in the Philippines) grew up studying the atrocities of colonialism and 333 years of cruel Spanish masters that the term “hispanic” is based on hatred of enslavement.

    Mind you, that is passe’ and colonialism occured through-out Latin America to indigenous and African slaves but you have two views…excuse me, two CORRECT views that cannot find a middle ground.

    One view sees “hispanic” in terms of language and Spanish blood. The other sees it as commonality in culture, religion, customs and historical evolution that forged similarities from centuries of Spanish colonialism.

    It would benefit the Hispanic world if they embrace Filipinos as Hispanics by virtue of more leverage and influence at the global level.

    FYI, in the next couple of decades, China will have 300,000,000 English speakers (mainly 2nd language) and India will boast 100,000,000 “first” language speakers.

    Hispanics need every door of opportunity to survive the Asian onslaught of political, economic and military infulence while using the English language to communicate with “it’s” conquerers.

    Thank you!

  • L.A.

    It’s really hard for any Filipino to embrace it’s Hispanic heritage when most Filipinos do not travel to Latin America. They only see the negative stereotypical images of “Mexicans”, which unfairly translates to all Hispanics, when visiting the United States.

    I think one of the things that make it difficult for Filipino or Filipino Americans to identify with being Hispanic is because they do not want to be affiliated with being;

    1) illegal and undocumented,

    2) undeducated and no professional ambitions,

    3) gang members and criminals,

    and other negative stereotypical images prompted by the powerful American media.

    Likewise, it is easier for them to embrace thier “geographic” location of Asia, and not thier cultural affiliation with Latin America, and identify themselves of how Asians, the Model Minority, are perceived in the U.S.

    Sad, but true…

    • Henry V.

      I somewhat find some truth in what you said. Mexicans make 65% of the spanish-speaking population in the U.S. It is their image – uneducated, undocumented and backward indigenous mixture, that make “all” the other hispanic communities feel a little ashamed to be considered Latino or Hispanic.

      • latinaDE_VERDAD

        no no no no no.. you see a true hispanic / latino finds no shame or negativity associated with the term. if anyone feels offended by the stereotypes we either emphasize we are not “mexican” if wrongly put in the category or talk shit right back. it’s filipinos w. their foot half way in and out b.c even they can’t all agree on what they “want to be” essentially, who would want to take back their “hispanidad” if it seemed to paint them in a negative light. i mean stereotypes come w. any culture and if you’re against getting (the usual)

        1) illegal and undocumented,

        2) undeducated and no professional ambitions,

        3) gang members and criminals,

        then step back already.

    • Markuva

      If I wanted to talk like this….. “eh yo yo yo n-word, why you be crowdin me n-word, like why you tryin’ na drink ma corona n-word, where yo lady at n-word? ‘i’m hernando gutierrez n-word why you be askin n-word, i’ll bust a cap in yo ass n-word, my mexican @ss cut yo n-word ass…” …. then I would claim to be hispanic.

      Yes – it’s true. Hispanic culture is always on the news: gutterrierez, martinez, hernandez, sanchez, gonzalez – – – always on the news for stabbing the girlfriend, boyfriend, rape, robbery, murder . . .
      and illegal aliens harboring 20 or so people and draining social services. Hispanic has the lowest of the low reputation alongside with black people.

      why? I don’t see any resemblance of my people to that?

      …. If you want to refute my “F-A-C-T-S” just turn on your local news station on the radio or TV – – – then debate me fo i bussss a cap in yo n-word ass gangsta blackspanic style.

    • Markuva

      It’s good and true. Why would anyone who doesn’t really look like a Mexican or Nicaraguan or Argentinian or Salvadorean want to or have to pretend to be what he or she is not racially or culturally.

      Would you want to associate with gang bangers, rapists, batterers, assaulters, drug runners, and domestic violence perpetrators?

      Are you on Crack much? Salamat, Mabuhay !!! Does that sound Spanish to you, Muchacho cucaracha? Burrito Enchilada?

  • Eleuterio Masera

    cuanto daño ha hecho la americanización de Filipinas a todos los Filipinos……
    La cultura hispana es la que creó Filipinas como nación, la cultura hispana es idioma, tradiciones, sangre, genética y todo eso está dentro de Filipinas….así que Filipinas es el “primo tonto” de los pueblos Hispánicos ,,, digo tonto porque sus políticos decidieron (claramente pagados por los americanos) dejar de hablar español.

    • nold

      @ Eleuterio Masera – Thank you for visiting the site, you’re right that much of what has been removed was the making of the Politicos who submitted to the US. People argue that since we no longer use Spanish we no longer have the right to claim that we are Hispanics, this is a shallow analogy, we not only adapted the Spanish ways, in time it evolved and became uniquely Filipino. Just like what you said, Hispanization is “la cultura hispana es idioma, tradiciones, sangre, genética”. Not because I celebrate my Hispanic identity and tradition, like many of us, means I’m less of a Filipino, people who brand hispanistas as unpatriotic could not even define what Filipino means, because its very definition is the result of a process that made it identifiable today, remove it and you’ll no longer identify the Filipino.

      • latinaDE_VERDAD

        Hispanization is “la cultura hispana es idioma, tradiciones, sangre, genética”

        you lost the language and only 2% have spanish blood , therefore genetics. so i guess tradition is all you need. if you agree you have evolved as a people as a culture then stop trying to identify with only one of the variables in the equation

      • Markuva

        Aw. Tsk, tsk, tsk. You want to associate with the drug dealers, the pimps, the chronically incarcerated, the violent, the illegal aliens, the ramirez, guttierrez, hernandez, gonzalez, sanchez world of violence, drugs, murder, rape, robbery, and assault. Aw . . . Sayang. Mabuhay !!!! Maraming Salamat, but Sayang . . . . . .

  • pelotillo

    Es una pena que el genocidio norteamericano durante 1901-1909 haya asesinado a 1/7 de la población filipina para erradicar el español y la herencia cultural española. Los americanos no pudieron vencer al español y tuvieron que bombardear y destruir intramuros. Es una vergüenza!

    It is a pitty that the american genocide during 1901-1909 killed more than 1/7th of the filipino population in order to root out spanish heritage. The americans coud not finish their work until they bombed and destroyed Manila Intramuros. Shame on that!

    • observer

      pelotillo…

      it is true. however;

      1) as the spanish language is reintroduced to selected secondary schools and re-emphasized at the university level,

      2) with the assistance and moral support of “all” of spain’s former colonies,

      3) the aggressive p/r by “istituto cervantes of the p.i.,”

      4) the 300,000 chavacano speakers,

      5) president Arroyo’s vision of the growing importance of spanish worldwide aka globalization,

      = the philippines could finally experience a long deserved hispanic-renaissance. Lets hope and see…

      • Erwin José Abcede

        ¡Olé!

      • Markuva

        the only kind of Hispanic renaissance that the world is experiencing is this:

        robberies, guns, rape, violence, murder, drugs, illegal aliens, chaos, poverty . . . . .

        This is the reality that is hispanic culture. The philippines may be poor – – – but at least when you turn on the news you won’t see hispanics with the names ramirez, guttierrez, hernandez, martinez, sanchez, gonzalez every 5 minutes killing, raping, murdering, assaulting, robbing, and committing violence everyday 24/7 / 365.

        The only people who cater to Spanish-speaking people are not making any money becaue Spanish-speaking people are the poorest of the poor, draining social services, committing all sorts of violent crimes.

        Filipinos are not hispanic, and thank god for that. Thank God. There is a reason for everything. Thank God.

        Mabuhay !!!!! Salamat !!!!!

      • Markuva

        Hispanic renaissance? Are you on Mexican brown heroin? The hispanic world is experiencing an economic pounding like no jailbird has ever experienced in his life . . . Renaissance? What pipe are you smoking?

        There is not one nation in the world, third world or otherwise that wants to associate with rapists, murderers, drug runners, thieves, liars, domestic batterers or robbers that are the hispanic countries.

        No one in any southeast asian country identifies with the 5 o’clock TV news stories about the Ramirez, Hernandez, Sanchez, Guttierrez who just killed 5 people, raped 3 people, got caught with drugs, or battered his wife.

        No one. No one. Entiendes?

        Salamat !!!! Mabuhay !!!!! No soy una criminale hispanic.

        Thanks be to Goddess.

  • nold

    The American were the one who started calling Hispanics based on their language, thats is why we have the US Govt official term, Latino, since all hispanics speaks Spanish anyway – but the problem is Italian and Portuguese are also Latino languages, should we call them Latinos too?

    Identity is rooted in traditions, culture and history – we have no right to call ourselves Filipino if we keep on denying that much of what we have now, including our religion even our food – came from our hispano past.

    • latinaDE_VERDAD

      “but the problem is Italian and Portuguese are also Latino languages, should we call them Latinos too?”

      NO b.c they are europeans (white). Latinos are those of latin america. you also cannot deny how much of your culture and tradition comes from chinese/malay/indo/austronesian roots. i just don’t see why you are obsessed w. being identified as hispanic. Really. . what a lovely mix and you only want to specify w. one that doesn’t even claim you. i said it before . you are no more hispanic than jamaicans are british!

      • De AnDA

        “doesn’t even claim you” – or is it just you who wouldn’t want to🙂 But I have to give it to you this time your comments has kept this post alive thank you.

        You’d be surprise that even Filipino heroes has claimed to be Hispanic for understandable reason – they fought for it. Like what I told you before, we have a fundamental disagreement in defining what makes a Filipino. My definition is following the historical consciousness of the very people that fought for equality and succeeded against the Spaniards – as Filipinos – using what they’ve acquired from the 400 years of being under the same masters your country had.

    • Markuva

      wow. you’re a little out of it. let me set you straight. in 1500s or something, there was a decree (law) that required natives to hispanicize their names.

      What’s in a name?

      Just because a food has a spanish name doesn’t make it hispanic.

      Our food, if anything, is more Chinese – – – (get it right)

      – we eat lumpia (they eat lumpia in indonesia. last time i looked indonesians were southeast asian – wtf. hahaha. get it right)

      – we eat jasmine rice, sticky rice, steamed rice
      – we eat lugaw (rice porridge)
      – we eat lemongrass, dragonfruit, rambutan, jackfruit . . . durian
      – we eat coconut jelly drinks (just like other southeast asians)

      Wow. Please. Please. Get your “ulo” out of your “puwet” ok?

      No Hispana. Hispanic America is seen for what it is everyday on the TV and radio News (media) as a violent homicidal culture. No way, Jose. <

    • Markuva

      Dude – here’s another crackhead who thinks that being filipino has anything to do with gangster hispanics.

      We have this huge area / portion of our country that doesn’t have anything to do with hispanic basura. It’s called the Southern Philippines – this is what we look like without Spain.

      We look great. We don’t want to be associated with all of the violent crime that we see on the TV committed by Hispanics.

      Entiendes Jose Ramirez, Maria Guttierrez, Pepe Conchocho Enchilada and Roberto Burrito?

      Salamat !!! mabuhay !!!!

  • Davíd

    Yes the PH is in ASIA obviously but she has been dissociated from ASIA when it became part of the Spanish empire for 333 years for crying out loud. Hispanidad has something to do with INFLUENCE, RELIGION, CULTURE & LANGUAGE not race that’s pathetic.

    • Markuva

      B-R-A-V-O !!!!!!! B-R-A-V-O !!!!!!! Thank you for posting something that makes sense. I agree. I don’t ever want to associate with Hispanics – violence, murder, always on the news for heinous crimes. Not good. I never want to downgrade my culture or race – – – I am southeast asian, thank you.

      :)))

      I love my 12-16 hour plane rides across the Pacific Ocean to the Far EAst. We are 1 hour by plane from Hong Kong. I love my Ami relatives in southern Taiwan.

      Salamat !!!!

    • Markuva

      Southern Philippines – where’s the hispanic there? Eff this hispanica bullsheezica. WTF Mexicans Nicaraguans Bolivians Hondurans – – – please take us off the Calling List.

      We don’t want to be telemarketed anymore – we don’t want anything to do with you or your crime or your ignorance and we’re not hispanic racially or even culturally – names and paint don’t a race make.

      We’d like to be put on the No Hispanic list – Do Not Call.

      Verdad? Entiendes? No hablo Espanol basura criminal violente.

  • Davíd

    ABSOLUTELY YES MIKE. Hispanicity has nothing to do with race or physical attributes. Equatorial Guinea is a Hispanic African nation. You’re narrowing down the idea of hispanidad.

  • mike

    look im married to a filipina here in australia……i went there for the first time to manila and then down to her parents province…..to me and here in australia filipinos are considerd ASIAN!!!..yes they do have spanish influence but they look exactly the same as indos malays and thais……what about the east timorese are they hispanic as well!! they wherer colonized by the portugese also….even there language is close to indonesian and malay alot of words having the same meaning….so basically from my observation they are strongly more connected with Asia than hispana

    • TanBrownAllAround

      Mike, have you traveled into Mexico, Central America, Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia and observed the indigenous populations there?

      You need to stop thinking Australian. Your ethnicity is world renowned for being the most closed-minded, racist, unwelcoming to people of color of ALL the civilized world.

      • latinaDE_VERDAD

        youre rude – obviously he is not closed-minded, racist, unwelcoming to people of color . his wife is filipina. he visited her family. READ and stop taking your anger out on an open-minded australian guy in a mixed marriage. !

      • Markuva

        TanBrown –

        WTF?!? Sounds like you have some sort of Mel Gibson movie, “APOCALYPTO” fantasy worship goin’ on. No dude, seems like you haven’t traveled to the far east (I don’t agree with anything you’re saying – sounds like you need some smelling salts or a good stiff cup of coffe mocha java) No amount of salsa, guacamole, pinto bean, or tequila is going to convince anyone that a filipino in southeast asia who eats steamed white rice and egg rolls (lumpia) that filipinos are hispanic. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA Puhleeze, Muchachito !!!

        Balikbayan boxes don’t get sent to the Americas, man. They get sent overseas by millions of short black haired slanty eyed people – to their kababayan in southeast asia, you misdirected and misguided little bedazzled APOCALYPTO fan. Lumpia. We eat Lumpia like they do in Indonesia, misguided dude. We eat white jasmine sticky steamed rice. We like to flick butterfly knives at outsiders (the Balisong). We have batik and bamboo. We swim in the south china sea, snorkel in our reefs . . . We have sultanates (poor ones, but nonetheless . . . ) We have arabic / sanskrit in our language and culture, too – but we don’t call ourselves Arabs.
        Our languages is mutually intelligible with some southern Taiwan tribes. We have ethnic features that are very malay as well as our language.

        Dude – – – you’re lost in your Mayan Apocalypto world. Hahahaha. Don’t Apocalypto me (<< that's a joke on the phrase: "Don't Orientalize me," based on a book by Edward Said, but I won't blow your mind – 'cos it doesn't seem like you'd be able to take in so much thrown at you at one time.)

        It's ok. I like your Apocalypto fantasy. I never saw the movie though, but I did see the trailer with those fierce-ass warriors. Is that why the Hispanic culture is so violent (whenever I turn on the news I see all the murder, robbing, violence, and drug gang violence on TV committed by some person with a name ending in -ez). Aw, dude…. be whatever you want to be. You can choose to be whatever…. just wanted to give you a glimpse into 90% of what's in the minds of filipinos (the ones who know better) and those around the world in the know.😉

        Adios, Muchacho !!!!

    • Ruben

      they also look somewhat like the people of southeast Asia. It maybe a mistake to categorize people by what continent they live in. Some Russians, certainly Arabs, and Japanese would be lumped into the same category. I think of Hispanics as people who speak Spanish as a native tongue even when it was forced upon them as in the case of the peoples of Southern North America of aztecs of Mayan decent what about the South American Incas they too are Hispanic as are the blacks in Cuba or Puerto Rico that were also Spanish colonies. Once you cease to speak the language I think you are no longer Hispanic as I think someone with the name like Wagner who lost touch with his ancestors language would no longer be German.

      • nold

        Language plays an important role in defining nationality, l think this is also the reason why nationalist started to call the national language Filipino-Pilipino, so the language and the national is one – this is what they wanted people to accept. There is a confusion with these two, anyway, I don’t agree with your point because Spanish, although was never widespread, it permeated with all the major languages. I like what the Jesuit Arcilla said about our Hispanic identity, that if you would take all that we got from it we would not recognize the Filipino. The American historian Leddy-Phelan was accurate when he described the Filipino as being fully Hispanized.

        • Markuva

          Well, if you just use your eyes and ears – would you agree that the filipino (quote unquote) was “fully Hispanized [sic]”?

          I mean, C-O-M-E O-N !!!! Hahahaha.

          You are so not that gullible.

          “Fully Hispanicized ”

          Really?

          Really?

          So you think:

          a) GENERALLY – Filipinos understand Spanish?
          b) Eat Spanish food (white steamed rice is Spanish?)
          c) You seriously (and I mean “seriously”) think that Filipinos look European / Latino / Hispanic?
          d) Are you high on crack????
          e) Do you travel ???????

          HAHAHAHAHA LOL. LOL. LOL.

          No amount of salsa, pinto beans, guacamole, spanish rice, paint, magic marker, radiation, delusion, acts of god are going to make me or my entire lot of filipino relatives Hispanic. LOL No effing way. Hahahahaha.

          Tell Daly City and Pacifica that Hispanic America wants its 10,000,000 rice cookers back and all of the rice cakes and egg rolls back.

          LOL. LOL. LOL.

          If I told my relatives that today they will cease to get their white steamed jasmine rice, their dinuguan, their fish, their egg rolls, their rice cakes, and karaoke machines (minus one) – – – 100 million “ANOs??????????????” will be heard ’round the effing world.

          Put a Mexican and a Filipino together in a room (a lot of filipinos are racist and wouldn’t really dig that) and they wouldn’t be able to communicate outside of English. Oh yeah – Filipinos will all say they know Spanish, but if you like your Spanish a la TACO BELL or a mexican menu, a la es o si que es (spells socks) – then have at it. Prove me wrong. Ever hear a Filipino spanish accent? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHA

          HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

          LOL. LOL. LOL. LOL.

          DALY CITY . . . Hispanic. Hahahahahahahahaha. Rice Cookers. Karaoke.

          Yeah. Gotcha, Pablo !!!!

      • latinaDE_VERDAD

        no nold – filipinos are not fully hispanized and not speaking the language IS a big reason.

        • Markuva

          Thank you !!!! Thank you for being leve-headed and intelligent. Thank you for conveying that you are a person of reason and common sense. Thank you !!!!!

          If we even W-A-N-T-E-D to be Hispanic we would be speaking Spanish at 100 miles an hour like Hispanics do, rolling our Rs like this: rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr . . . I won’t go on because I’ve stated the facts and opinions in previous posts, but again – – – THANK YOU !!!

  • Davíd

    Tenemos que conocer acerca de la diversidad de nuestra cultura. Recuerde, nuestra cultura es ni oriental ni occidental. Somos influido por las tres culturas: Lumad, Moro y La Gente de las Tierras Bajas (Cultura Hispana). Somos no Americano pero Filipino. Aprenda la lenguas locales y lengua nacional! Aprenda la lengua española porque tambien es la herencia Mexicana y España. No estas ignorantes. Mabuhay ang nasod sa Pilipinas! ¡Adelante La Republica Filipina!

  • Mary

    1) geographically Asian, 2) culturally Hispanic influenced, and 3) linguistcally uses English as a second language.

    These are three reasons that make if difficult to define filipinos, yet these are the same three reasons that “do” define them…

    It’s a unique situation really, and I love it!!!

    • Markuva

      And Mary – you forgot to add that Filipinos aren’t Hispanic because if we were we would: a) be on the new everyday 24/7/365 for i) murder ii) rape iii) assault iv) robbery v) drugs vi) domestic violence
      b) have names like ramirez, sanchez, guttierrez, hernandez, and martinez and not names like mandaluyong, tatlonghari, batungbakal, bibing, bong-bong, saling, moning, doring, . . .
      c) seriously speak spanish fluently which we don’t – and pretending to speak spanish fluently is not the same as actually speaking spanish fluently d) be sending balikbayan boxes to: nicaragua, honduras, el salvador, brazil, chile . . . e) be eating pinto beans and tortillas f) eating more corn, corn flour, maize, … g) ……………………..

  • Ulysses Gramophone

    Interesting discussion. I have friends and associates from Korea, Japan and Indonesia, and I have to say that few of them think of Filipinos as an Asian people, in any sense other than geographic. Knowledgeable Koreans I have met say that Filipinos resemble Mexicans or even Africans (possibly having met some Aetas), rather than Asians. An Indonesian friend once said that culturally the Philippines is very far from Indonesia, Malaysia or Singapore (according to him, most Filipinos can’t even find Indonesia on a map, much less connect to an imaginary shared heritage).

    • Markuva

      . . . and the English think that Irish are N-words and Australians call Brits POMEs (prisoners of mother england) and Japanese hate Koreans and you’re spouting normal human stuff. Yup. Filipinos fight with Indonesians, but still none of this nonsense you bring up is very relevant. People don’t like oneanother just like so many Filipinos wouldn’t be caught dead trying to be Mexican. Thanks for your post – – – which boils down to: yes, racism exists in the human spectrum. EUREKA !!!!! Not all asians have harmony !!! Whoa. No way, really?

  • nold

    zealous nationalist, or those pretending to be,worked behind the scenes to remove Spanish [language], these are shortsighted leaders, who abolished the official teaching of Spanish [authored by Senador Enrique Magalona during mid 1900’s] during the phony cory constitution, they should be ashamed that the language Claro M. Recto, Enrique Magalona, Adriatico, Rizal, and so many great Filipinos fought for was eradicated by their politics , simply because this idiotic leaders saw speaking and studying Spanish as unnationalistic, what these morons forgot is that we started this nation using Spanish as its language, her first constitution, her national anthem, her revolution, her greatest sons and daughters were spanish speakers, her greatest novels and poems were in Spanish, so how could we be less Filipinos in Spanish?

    • Markuva

      Yes masa. I’m a house N-word.

      See, what you are describing is the phenomenon of slaves keeping their slave names. Your quote unquote nation was started because some white european men sent some ships out to steal all your wares. However, you want to keep this indignity in your mind and you want to turn it into love. Sort of like some sort of “STOCKHOLM SYNDROME,” no?

      HAHAHA. Look in the mirror and repeat these words: “I am in love with the people who raped robbed and stole from the country which bears the name of this rapist robber stealer. I am some sort of victim. I’m still in the deep throes of STOCKHOLM SYNDROME.”

      Mabuhay !!!!!!! Salamat Tagalog !!!!! (and any other dialect that’s like deep tagalog and doesn’t use that nasty Spanish – – – which here in the westernized developed first world we consider the language of criminals, thieves, illegal aliens, muggers, gangsters, violent people, rapists, and murderers. . . )

      Delusional Stockholm Syndrome. I think it might be too late for you to be saved. Adios, Muchacho !!! Hasta Luego !!!

  • bravo

    They are going to teach the Spanish language -again- at the selected secondary schools? Wow…the Philippines is finally thinking “globalization.” For cultural exchange and more opportunities for the newer generations, I think it’s a positive move.

    • Markuva

      SPANISH is an express trip down a very dark and dank tunnel. It is not a boon for the country, but a “bust.” Think. Put on your Thinking cap and See the Big Picture:

      If you live in the industrialized first-world, you’ll realize that the only places that Spanish is spoken are:

      a) the welfare office
      b) the street corner where all of the illegal aliens (males) wait for work
      c) the dollar stores
      d) the thrift stores
      e) the bus stop
      f) south of the border (the desert, basically)
      g) the abortion clinic (but not really because hispanics don’t use birth control)
      h) the corner where heroin, cocaine, and crack are sold

      You get the picture.

      Any of my colleagues who are in business or are doctors and lawyers – only do “PRO BONO” work for the Spansh community, because there is no commercial success (i.e. – “getting rich”) off of the Hispanic communities – – – anywhere in the world.

      The future generations of Philipine students would do better for themselves to learn languages of commerce – – – the language where real commerce is done with real money – – – not charity pro bono):

      Being that English is a widely spoken language in the Philippines, I’ll exclude it from this list (it’s a very useful commerce language). Philippine students would have a million fold economic advantage if they knew T-H-E-S-E languages. Always Remember: Spanish is an Express Trip Downward, Spiraling, a Crash and Burn express trip into poverty and violence land – into hell, sadness, and being forlorn in the world (turn on your TV news if you don’t believe me. never ever ever associate with hispanics. this is true)

      a) Chinese
      b) Japanese
      c) German

      Languages of commerce – – –

      Stay away from the Spanish. It’s like a bad drug. spanish may as well be a pimp, a crack pipe, a heroin syringe, a pointed loaded gun facing you, a step forward in front of a cliff while blindfolded, a choice of two envelopes and you chose the wrong envelope with no multi million dollar lottery ticket, an all expense paid trip to a Greyhound bus station restroom, a dare to lick the tiles in the NYC subway and the reward reneged, a blind date with a serial killer . . .

      You get the picture – – – Spanish is a one way ticket down the road to ruin, sadness, and poverty.

      Spanish speakers are not consumers – – – they are the poorest citizens of the poorest countries on earth.

      Some people are lying to you, selling you a bill of goods. REJECT this, come into the light. Be smart. Use common sense. Travel. Get outta there !!!! Network. Get Pen-Pals, use the internet.

      Spanish / Hispanicization / Lies Lies All Lies. Don’t get led down the wrong road. Don’t choose the wrong envelope. Don’t choose the wrong door. Mexico and central america and south america are filthy and violent . . . . People of that quote unquote nation called the Philippines – – – stay on track with your Asian neighbors, your southeast asian neighbors. Yes, there is sibling and relational rivalry, but Spain nor Hispanics Nor violent Hispanic culture are definitely D-E-F-I-N-I-T-E-L-Y not going to help you. Stab you in a dark alley for your rice cakes is more like it. Spanish is the Devil. Turn Away towards the light.

      Didn’t you learn anything from the 300 + years???????? SAVE YOURSELVES from stupid people who can’t let go of their STOCKHOLM SYNDROME and dumbness (“I see stupid people, and they don’t even know they’re stupid…”) << modified movie line.

  • Marcelo

    Okay. Here’s my two cents worth.

    Being “Hispanic” in the U.S. context has some very political implications that need to be understood. Spaniards, for example, are not classified as “Hispanic,” but as “European.”

    Being Hispanic, in that sense, apart from its geographic and racial applications, implies I believe either fluency in Spanish (or Castillan, if you prefer) or the possession of a Spanish-speaking home background.

    The vast majority of Filipinos, and I mean more than ninety-nine percent, DO NOT come from a Spanish-speaking home environment. For them, Spanish is neither the mother tongue nor a first learned language. Most do not even have Spanish as a good second language, though this number, among Filipinos in the States, is definitely growing as a result of demographic influence and economic necessity.

    Not one in ten Filipinos in the States would be able to fully comprehend the Spanish written in the earlier posts.

    However, virtually all Filipinos who immigrate to the States from the Philippines have some Filipino language, either as a mother tongue or as a first learned language. There are several Filipino languages, including Tagalog, Ilokano, Kapampangan, Cebuano, Ilonggo and Chavacano. The last mentioned, Chavacano, is a heavily hispanized language, BUT IT IS NOT SPANISH AND WOULD NOT BE RECOGNIZED AS SPANISH ANYWHERE ELSE.

    Now here is the point. ALL Filipino languages are classified as Asian and have the closest linguistic affinity to neighboring languages. Filipino languages are cousins to Malay, Javanese, Achenese and even Polynesian languages, just as Spanish is a cousin to Portuguese, French and Italian. This is well-established scientifically and cannot be disputed.

    On the other hand, this does not mean that three-and-a-half centuries of Spanish colonial rule did not leave an indelible imprint on Filipino language, culture and religion.

    Parenthetically, the fact that more Filipinos are at home in English than in Spanish does not make them “Anglo-Saxon” either!

    I would also suggest that people be careful about throwing FOB-ness around. This is a very sensitive subject to many Filipinos and does not rest well with many of them.

    Going back to culture, Filipinos are closely linked in many deep levels with other Asians. Traditional Filipino attitudes towards family and community are definitely more Asian than Western.

    The bottom line is that Filipino-Americans can — if they see the political expediency of doing so and have the astuteness to act on this realization — identify with both the Hispanic and the Asian-Pacific Islander ethno-political communities in the U.S. If they are welcomed, Filipinos can have representatives in the AAPI and La Raza and so forth.

    One interesting aspect of this, and of globalization trends, is the hiring by the hundreds of Filipino teachers to staff schools along the border regions in the southern part of the U.S. Many of these teachers have been recruited to teach Engish. No doubt, they and their family members will also pick up a good working knowledge of Spanish.

    Vale!

    Marcelo

    • nold

      Hi Sr. Marcelo

      Hispanism does not pertain to language alone, actually its more culture and tradition than language. I could understand why people would relate it with THE language, because there, in the US, Latino [hispanic], has become an expanding demographic unit, an ethnonym, and since Spanish speakers are from different countries, the US response was the generalization of differentiating Spanish speakers from other immigrants by use of their language, calling all of them Hispanic or Latinos.

      The term Latino, which was officially adopted sometime in the 1990’s by the US government actually is incorrect, because Latino refers to other romance languages like Portuguese and Italian, this familiar mistake is made because Hispanism is tied to Spanish, the language.

      By the way, in NO former Spanish colony was Spanish the only language. It was the new republics that created educational systems the created use of Spanish. So if we adopted a curriculum that made used of Spanish, we would all be speaking Spanish right now. Of course, it didn’t happened, the US came in with their public schools and their so called progressive democratic ideas.

      We really do have a short memory, we forget that revolution’s language was Spanish, the original composition of our anthem was Spanish, our first constitution was in Spanish, our greatest literature was in Spanish, Filipinos names and places are in Spanish [most], the people who carried out the fight against the Spaniards were Spanish speakers, our Tagalog [not the bastardized Filipino or Taglish] has loads of Spanish influenced expressions – and that we don’t speak it now doesn’t mean we never did.

      un abrazo,

      Arnaldo

      • latinaDE_VERDAD

        “So if we adopted a curriculum that made used of Spanish, we would all be speaking Spanish right now. Of course, it didn’t happened, the US came in with their public schools and their so called progressive democratic ideas. ”

        i think it’s sad that you paint the U.S. in such a negative way i mean really democracy is what so many of us latin americans are fighting for in our corrupt dictatorships. REALLY you are only angry at the fact that they you weren’t learning spanish. which you obviously can see has robbed you of a part of your so called “hispanidad”. all of america could be speaking spanish right now too – but the british won – so what. the fact is latin america has our own dialects and yes native languages are spoken of course. but spanish is our official language and we kept it alive and i believe you helm resentment that philippines was quick to assimilate with US culture instead of latino.

      • Markuva

        Good luck, dude. Give it up. It’s undisputed that the colonizers didn’t teach the colonizees their native tongue (Hispanicsch). Can you feel the weight of 90% of the filipinos in the Philippines calling you a d-shi* mouth yapper. Give it up. Cierra la Boca.

    • Markuva

      KUDOS to your points that state that Filipinos aren’t Hispanic (you said a lot of stuff, so I just skimmed). Here’s what I think – (oh, and PS – those in the legal community think that La Raza is a huge racist organization. Yes, it’s true. They have that reputation).

      There’s nothing wrong with Hispanics so long as they just keep their hispanicness to themselves, right? So long as we all keep our facts straight and don’t venture into fantasyland.

      So, onto how I really feel:

      SPANISH is an express trip down a very dark and dank tunnel. It is not a boon for the country, but a “bust.” Think. Put on your Thinking cap and See the Big Picture:

      If you live in the industrialized first-world, you’ll realize that the only places that Spanish is spoken are:

      a) the welfare office
      b) the street corner where all of the illegal aliens (males) wait for work
      c) the dollar stores
      d) the thrift stores
      e) the bus stop
      f) south of the border (the desert, basically)
      g) the abortion clinic (but not really because hispanics don’t use birth control)
      h) the corner where heroin, cocaine, and crack are sold

      You get the picture.

      Any of my colleagues who are in business or are doctors and lawyers – only do “PRO BONO” work for the Spansh community, because there is no commercial success (i.e. – “getting rich”) off of the Hispanic communities – – – anywhere in the world.

      The future generations of Philipine students would do better for themselves to learn languages of commerce – – – the language where real commerce is done with real money – – – not charity pro bono):

      Being that English is a widely spoken language in the Philippines, I’ll exclude it from this list (it’s a very useful commerce language). Philippine students would have a million fold economic advantage if they knew T-H-E-S-E languages. Always Remember: Spanish is an Express Trip Downward, Spiraling, a Crash and Burn express trip into poverty and violence land – into hell, sadness, and being forlorn in the world (turn on your TV news if you don’t believe me. never ever ever associate with hispanics. this is true)

      a) Chinese
      b) Japanese
      c) German

      Languages of commerce – – –

      Stay away from the Spanish. It’s like a bad drug. spanish may as well be a pimp, a crack pipe, a heroin syringe, a pointed loaded gun facing you, a step forward in front of a cliff while blindfolded, a choice of two envelopes and you chose the wrong envelope with no multi million dollar lottery ticket, an all expense paid trip to a Greyhound bus station restroom, a dare to lick the tiles in the NYC subway and the reward reneged, a blind date with a serial killer . . .

      You get the picture – – – Spanish is a one way ticket down the road to ruin, sadness, and poverty.

      Spanish speakers are not consumers – – – they are the poorest citizens of the poorest countries on earth.

      Some people are lying to you, selling you a bill of goods. REJECT this, come into the light. Be smart. Use common sense. Travel. Get outta there !!!! Network. Get Pen-Pals, use the internet.

      Spanish / Hispanicization / Lies Lies All Lies. Don’t get led down the wrong road. Don’t choose the wrong envelope. Don’t choose the wrong door. Mexico and central america and south america are filthy and violent . . . . People of that quote unquote nation called the Philippines – – – stay on track with your Asian neighbors, your southeast asian neighbors. Yes, there is sibling and relational rivalry, but Spain nor Hispanics Nor violent Hispanic culture are definitely D-E-F-I-N-I-T-E-L-Y not going to help you. Stab you in a dark alley for your rice cakes is more like it. Spanish is the Devil. Turn Away towards the light.

      Didn’t you learn anything from the 300 + years???????? SAVE YOURSELVES from stupid people who can’t let go of their STOCKHOLM SYNDROME and dumbness (“I see stupid people, and they don’t even know they’re stupid…”) << modified movie line.

      I mean, "Come on !!! Come on now !!!" The black slave (House N-word) who starts to think that his culture is the one who puts the white cloth dinner napkin down at meals, sets out the silver, hosts the dinner party . . . is . . . well, what would you call that???? Healthy? Part of "black culture." "P-L-A-N-T-A-T-I-O-N HERITAGE?"

      "We gots da waltz in ours blood, da fine china, Tara, Rhett Butler, and coat tails in ours blood . . ."

      Y'know what I mean? Ya get what I'm sayin?

      I don't see Vietnam screaming out to its French Congolese (or whatever black nations speak french) brothers sayin' – – We, too, are African (French) because we share this culture and language . . . hahaha. wtf. . . . .

      Yes, please. Puhleeze. Let's not confuse a love for cha cha music with ethnicity and DNA.

      We are the 97%. Because less than 3% of Philippine blood is european / hispanic.

      Word, N-word. We ain't no hispanic gangstas. ;))))

  • Latino Filipino

    Filipinas quiere que el español vuelva a ser lengua oficial

    Se llama Gloria Macapagal Arroyo y es la presidenta de Filipinas. Quiere que el español vuelva a ser lengua oficial en el archipiélago, que fue tierra española desde 1565 hasta 1898. Aunque los norteamericanos impusieron el inglés en las islas a partir de esa fecha, el español siguió siendo lengua de rango oficial hasta 1987, cuando el Gobierno de Corazón Aquino la suprimió. Ahora Macapagal tiene un gesto de sensatez y solicita al Gobierno español que colabore en este proyecto. En buena lógica, España debería echar una mano.

    Quien ha hecho público el propósito del Gobierno filipino es Humberto López Morales, un filólogo cubano nacionalizado español que ejerce como secretario de la Asociación de Academias de la Lengua Española. Según ha informado EFE, López Morales, en la inauguración de un coloquio en Buenos Aires sobre la lengua española, afirmó que la gobernante filipina hará su petición de ayuda a España durante la visita que tiene prevista a nuestro país en el mes de diciembre.

    La colaboración de España con su antigua colonia puede consistir, según el filólogo cubano nacionalizado español, en el envío de profesores y material bibliográfico para la enseñanza del idioma, entre otras medidas. Si logra ayuda de las autoridades de España, posiblemente en enero dicte un decreto que oficialice el idioma español, sigue informando EFE, siempre citando a López Morales.

    En abril pasado, el Instituto Cervantes de Manila pidió al Gobierno filipino que volviera a incluir el estudio del español como lengua oficial dentro del currículum de los alumnos de la escuela pública. Filipinas suprimió el español de su sistema educativo en 1987, durante el Gobierno de la presidenta Corazón Aquino, bajo la nueva Constitución que se redactó tras la caída del régimen de Ferdinand Marcos. Más de 5.000 personas estudian actualmente español en el país, según datos del Instituto Cervantes. Es una cifra ridícula.

    En el terreno práctico, España posee recursos sobrados para colaborar en el proyecto de la presidenta Macapagal Arroyo. La proyección exterior de la cultura española, una vez desaparecido el Instituto de Cultura Hispánica creado por Franco, pasó a oscilar entre los ministerios de Exteriores y Cultura hasta pivotar sobre el Instituto Cervantes, ya en época de Felipe González. Se abrió entonces un periodo de confusión y solapamiento de competencias que, aún dando sus frutos, pudo haber ofrecido mejores rendimientos.

    El papel del Instituto Cervantes bajo el gobierno de Aznar fue afinado y clarificado, pero lo esencial del esfuerzo de cooperación cultural venía a recaer en Exteriores, ministerio cuyas prioridades rara vez coinciden con la potenciación de la cultura española. Después, con Zapatero, se impuso la doctrina de que el Cervantes debía evitar perfiles “expansionistas” y, aún más, integrar la proyección exterior de las lenguas vasca, catalana y gallega. La gestión de César Antonio Molina (hoy ministro de Cultura), generalmente elogiada, ha atemperado esa doctrina, pero el hecho es que la proyección exterior de la cultura española sigue pareciendo demasiado escasa.

    • Markuva

      Has this board been overtaken by a Spanish galleon or what? What? what? whut? Cristobal, Cristobal Colon – is that you? Or …

  • Hispana Filipina

    High School Filipino Kathleen Ferraren wins Latino Essay Writing Contest in DC
    Tue, October 2, 2007 7:37 am

    Kathleen’s Dad, Patrick Ferraren (in Virginia), a long lost friend, 30 years ago a co-staffer of The Forward at Colegio de San Jose-Recoletos, after we got reconnected wrote:

    “How can a young contemporary Filipina lay claim to Hispanic Heritage, compete with other DC area high school Hispanics in an essay contest about how being Latino is the best of both worlds in the USA, and win? Answer: By weaving a connection that is indisputably valid, drawing on her life’s experiences that enhance the connection, and expressing her feelings about the significance of that Spanish connection–utilizing her unique personal style of literary writing that appeals to her audience. She made it light reading and interestingly anecdotal, with relevant facts. The dozen or so judges approved and gave it to her. Who would have known? Pardon my “estoy muy orgulloso” father attitude, but this makes for an interesting English Lesson because it is true. Here is an example of how to write a winning piece! In the real world!” (I asked Patrick that I post Kathleen’s winning piece as I find this very inspiring for our young Danawanons in California as well as all other young Pinays. – Monching)

    SOY LATINA TAMBIEN

    Kathleen is my given name but I recall my parents called me by my Spanish name, Catalina, when I was four years old. Both my parents are Filipinos of mixed origin—mostly Spanish and Asian. Having immigrated to America from the Philippines, they brought their colorful cultures to the melting pot that is America. I was brought up in a Roman Catholic household where the Santo Niño and the Virgen stood on an altar.

    Although my parents’ home country, the Philippines, is located in Asia, it has a lot to share with other Latino countries. Named after Madrid’s King Philip II, the country was colonized by Spain from 1565 to 1898.

    My parents decided that I would grow up learning English only. However, they would often insert Spanish words—embossed into their culture from 333 years of Spanish rule—into daily conversation. I was used to hearing other people muttering about my and other children’s foibles, complaining with sacrilegious words of Jesús y María, and when we were especially clumsy, Jesús, María y José. Refusals to eat my empanada or drink my leche earned me a slap on the arm and an order of habre.

    Around this time, when I was about three, my mother and my tía thought that it would be charming to dress up my cousin and me up in matching outfits. Next to my lacy camisetas, beautiful fans from Sevilla, and handed down jewelries, my mother’s favorite outfit for me was a bright red tiered Spanish dress with puffy sleeves and white lace. I hated it and cried often when I was forced to wear it to parties.

    “Put it on, hija” commanded my mother.

    “No, mamá” I replied defiantly.

    “You’ll never go to Nicky’s again,” warned my mother, forcing the itchy heap over my head.

    “Jesús, María y José!” I protested, promptly earning me a time-out.

    After that episode, my parents considered augmenting my Spanish in addition to the trite expressions. Already I was going around telling my fellow preschoolers that yes, babies could talk, because ga-ga in Pilipino (a language sporadically infused with Spanish) meant stupid. My father especially nudged me to learn Castilian, and he continues to advocate the vosotros conjugation and th lisp to this day.

    After seven years, I began to grumble. It irked me when another student was given the Spanish name Catalina. I had to settle for Catrina. The misnomer tormented me, and my interest waned. “Soy Catalina,” I used to murmur. “Why do I have to learn, anyway? In America, people speak English.”

    “Huh,” my mother replied. “It is your heritage, and many people in America speak Spanish. Besides, don’t you want to be able to read Don Quixote in its original Spanish?”

    That last reason remains my biggest motivation of all. Since I am still not fluent in the language, my second-hand hardcover still lies enticingly on my bookshelf. I will suffer patiently like the steadfast Florentino Ariza. However, I have succumbed to the charms of Gabriel García Márquez and Isabel Allende, whose words I devour amid sobs and laughter. I have also given way to telenovelas, RBD, and reggaeton.

    I finally had a chance to practice my Spanish during this year’s spring break on a school trip to Perú and Ecuador. I spent many happy hours enjoying the warmth and joy of the people, and I nearly leapt out of my chair in a restaurant when local musicians played “Qué sera, sera,” a song that my father used to sing to me when I was very little. Cheering and wearing red, I ran into the celebrating throngs in Plaza de Armas when the local Cienciano team won the South American World Cup. I gaped at the majestic Sacsayhuamán, I ate cuy, and I took care not to use the Sagrada Familia’s names in vain in the beloved Iglesia de San Francisco. My most unforgettable experience, however, was getting lost on the mountain Machu Picchu.

    By the time I started to descend, it was already sunset. Anyone who has been up that long, treacherous mountain can understand the terror it inspired in me as I stumbled in the dark, often losing my footing and hearing snakes in the undergrowth. I found myself conversing with the Urubamba below and clutching my Incan cross that I had bought from the tienda. When I finally emerged along with my fellow hikers, our guide tried to calm us down with Inca Kola and stories of his home life in Lima.

    “Well, I like to spend time with my wife and daughter,” he began. “And I catch up on telenovelas.”

    “Ooh, do you watch Rebelde?” I asked eagerly, and conversed with him in as much Spanish as I could muster.

    I returned home victoriously spouting colloquial Spanish and proclaiming myself a Latina. That entire trip, more than anything else, made me realize how much the Spanish culture is ingrained in people’s lives, including mine, albeit not entirely native. I consider myself a far-extended product of Spanish progeny and regale, however vicariously, in its influence and impact to the world. We as a people have a proud history, and our language unites us and defines our culture. Culture is how one lives his heritage: the dances my mother knew, the songs on the guitarra my father would sing, the religion we practice, the wars we fought, and the glorious lands of our fathers that are worth dying for. Everything is filled with our passion for life. And so we are fortunate to live in the United States, who celebrates and integrates our unique culture with her own. Here, we are offered opportunities that we may not have had back home, and our countries stand together in friendship.

    My dream is to take a road trip across Spain and to dance the flamenco in the middle of Madrid, amid shouts of Olé from the audience. And then, of course, to eat chicharrones and vindictively spill them all over my puffy and lacy red dress.

    • Markuva

      Yeah. Okay. Got it. If you’re the less than 3% of quote unquote “F-I-L-I-P-I-N-O-S” so coined by European decree – – – then you probably shouldn’t even be commenting on this thread, because you are in fact H-I-S-P-A-N-I-C which to many is not a good word.

      Not a good word… and in reality “r-e-a-l-i-t-y” not a good word because many associate hispanic with welfare, drugs, guns, violence, etc. etc.

      I’m so happy that you’re European – – bravo. However, the majority of southeast asian filipinos don’t consider T-H-E-M-S-E-L-V-E-S hispanic.

      So, you had your 15 minutes, let us non-hispanic filipinos battle it out here with Taco Bell wannabes.

      Gracias, Por Favor. Hora le (sp?) How do you say and write that? No escrimo espana and thank god !!!! :)))

      don’t hispanicize me (<< that's a p lay on Edward Said's book "Orientalism" and asian americans women who joke around saying, "don't orientalize me," never mind – you probably don't get it.

      Viva: white jasmine rice, isda, lambanog, bibingka, lumpia, jackfruit, durian, mung beans, rice cookers, lychees, longans, rambutan . . . . hahaha . . . . coconut milk, halo halo . . .

      hehehe

  • Bryceo

    ¿QUÉ QUEDA DE ESPAÑA EN FILIPINAS?
    Por Antonio M. Molina (*)

    Conferencia en el SEECI reproducida por kaibigan kastila web
    NOTA sobre A.M. Molina, por J.R. Perdigón (2003)

    Los que cifran su verdad en la estadística tienen ganada la partida si se trata de calibrar la presencia española en Filipinas en función del número de hispano-hablantes. El resultado negativo es obvio, con su carga de pesimismo. Acepto el resultado, pero no su connotación adversa. Somos una minoría los filipinos que poseemos el idioma español en relación con la totalidad de la población nacional. Pero, esto no nos debe llamar a escándalo.
    Recordemos, lo primero, que el español no fue nunca idioma del pueblo filipino. Más bien, siempre fue patrimonio exclusivo de una minoría; entiéndase Gobierno, Iglesia, Milicia, el Comercio y los ámbitos de la docencia y las artes. No hay porqué hurgar ahora en las razones que expliquen esta realidad histórica y aún coetánea. Basta con aceptar el hecho consumado. Lo que nos ahorraría rasgarnos las vestiduras innecesariamente. Después de todo, no empiece la porfía de continuados avatares adversos, esa minoría pervive en nuestros días.
    Lo que interesa pues, es conservarla cuando menos y, cuando más, ampliarla hasta sus máximas posibilidades. En esto radica la agonía del español en Filipinas; bien entendido, que empleo la palabra agonía en su sentido unamuniano. Unamuno, en efecto, nos advierte que no debemos confundir agonía con muerte ni siquiera relacionarlas indefectiblemente, porque se puede morir sin agonía y hay, en cambio quienes viven en la agonía y por la agonía. Esto, insisto, es cuanto acontece en Filipinas.
    La agonía o lo que es lo mismo, la lucha por la supervivencia del español en Filipinas es secularmente denodada. Sin el apoyo, ni siquiera el agradecimiento, de los países hermanos allende los mares, los filipinos, incansables, vamos apuntalando la conservación del idioma español, propiciando así adeptos y cultivadores del mismo, que, lenta pero inexorablemente, reemplacen a los que por ley de vida ahuecan nuestras filas en el decurso de los años.
    La Academia Filipina de la Lengua Española, correspondiente de la Real Academia Española; la concesión anual del Premio Literario Zóbel de tan rancio sabor e indudable prestigio; el Instituto Cervantes, últimamente; la Asociación de Maestros de Español; las aulas de español en los principales centros docentes, así estatales como privados; los recientes acuerdos entre las autoridades filipinas y el Ministerio español de Asuntos Exteriores y la Radiotelevisión Española en orden a intensificar el aprendizaje y cultivo del español en Filipinas; las modestas publicaciones periódicas y los humildes títulos editoriales, así como la fidelidad de los hogares cuyo idioma sigue siendo el español, todos, según sus posibles y con unánime afán, van aportando su clásico granito de arena en pro del ideal común. No hemos rendido, pues, la plaza. Ni se rendirá, porque hacemos nuestra la firme convicción de nuestro eximio poeta Claro Recto, al apostrofar de esta guisa a la lengua de esa minoría filipina:

    No morirás jamás en nuestro suelo
    que aún guarda tu esplendor. Quien lo pretenda
    ignora que mis templos y mis ágoras
    son de bloques que dieron tus canteras

    Los que por otro lado, ciñen lo hispánico al idioma español, cuando comprueban que en Filipinas esta lengua hispana, como ya se ha apuntado, se habla muy minoritariamente, creyendo incluso que va camino de su extinción, nos acosan con angustia: “¿Qué queda ya de España en Filipinas?” Antes de responder, permitidme anteponga una afirmación asaz categórica: Lo hispánico no se agota con el idioma. El hispanismo es más, mucho más que un mero asunto de gramática o de filología tan siquiera de literatura, aunque también abarque todo esto. ¡Mengua sería que España hubiese legado a Filipinas tan sólo su habla, cantarina y bella por demás!
    Y ahora responderé a la pregunta, que vuelvo a formular: ¿Qué queda ya de España en Filipinas? En otras palabras, ¿Qué realidad ostenta aún la presencia española en mi país?
    Lo primero, a despecho de los llamados espíritus fuertes, esa realidad es la religión católica. El Cristianismo llamó a todas las puertas de Oriente, pero, solamente, bogando en naves españolas, encontró acogida en Filipinas. No extrañe, por tanto, que Filipinas sea “El Unico País Cristiano en el Extremo Oriente”. Nuestra fe religiosa no es relumbrón ocasional, sino que subyace en el trasfondo de nuestro diario quehacer, perfila nuestro modo de ser y aflora en los momentos transcendentales de nuestra vida nacional.
    De ahí que, por ejemplo, no obstante, intentonas reiteradas en contrario, quedan proscritos en nuestra legislación el aborto, la eutanasia y el divorcio vincular. Por otra parte, el Estado queda obligado, por ley, a proporcionar enseñanza religiosa en los centros docentes gubernamentales a todos los escolares cuyos padres así lo soliciten por escrito. Y si ampliamos la mirada, observaremos que las festividades locales de la inmensa mayoría de nuestras ciudades y pueblos giran alrededor de su Santo Patrón. ¡En cuántas poblaciones, cuando la Misa Mayor de los domingos, todavía se interpreta la Marcha Real española en el momento de la Consagración!.
    Los ritos cuaresmales -Sermón de las siete palabras, lavatorio de los pies, recorrido de los monumentos, que allá se conoce con el nombre español de “Visita Iglesias”, oficio de tinieblas, los “Nazarenos” y demás penitentes públicos con sus correspondientes flagelaciones, las procesiones del Santo Entierro y la Soledad en Viernes Santo y la del Encuentro en Domingo de Resurrección -todos son hitos inconfundibles de lo que España dejara en Filipinas en el curso de la trisecular convivencia fil-hispana. Al igual que esas otras procesiones de impacto nacional como son la de la Virgen del Santísimo Rosario, que, con el nombre de “La Naval”, conmemora con apoyo oficial del Estado, la milagrosa victoria alcanzada por los marinos filipinos y españoles contra las fuerzas de la armada holandesa en 1646, la de Jesús Nazareno de Quiapo, en Manila, exclusivamente para varones, y la fluvial de la Virgen de Peña de Francia en la ciudad de Naga, en Camarines, todas las cuales se originan durante el régimen español en Filipinas y perduras hasta nuestros días. Lo mismo cabe decir del “Santacrusan” -filipinización de la expresión española: Santa Cruz-, que es una especie de procesión cívico-religiosa, que desfila diariamente durante todo el mes de mayo, en honor de la Invención de la Santa Cruz, y en cuyo recorrido los alumbrantes cantan, a dos voces, en español el santo rosario. Podemos citar, para mayor abundancia, las misas de Aguinaldo, que se celebran diariamente, a las cuatro de la mañana, desde el dieciseis de diciembre hasta el día veinticuatro de dicho mes, cuando llegan a su culmen a medianoche, con la Misa del Gallo, entonándose en ellas villancicos españoles al son de castañuelas y panderetas. ¿Y que decir de las innumerables romerías a santuarios tan famosos como los de la Virgen de la Paz y Buen Viaje en el pueblo de Antípolo y de la Virgen del Rosario de Mananag, en la provincia de Pangasinán? Todas estas manifestaciones nos hablan de la labor perdurable de España en mi país.
    Pero, citemos un acontecimiento de los años recientes. Me refiero a la incruenta revolución que derrocó la férrea dictadura de Ferdinand Marcos. Cuando éste ordena a las Fuerzas Armadas que consigan la rendición y captura de su Ministro de Defensa, Juan Ponce Enrile, y de su Jefe de Estado Mayor, el general Fidel Ramos Valdés (en la actualidad Presidente de Filipinas habiendo sucedido en el cargo a la presidente Corazón Aquino, verdadera autora de susodicha revolución) así como a sus doscientos seguidores, que se atrincheran en los Cuarteles Generales, Mons. Jaime Sin, Cardenal Arzobispo de Manila, a través de la emisora Veritas, del Episcopado Católico, hace un llamamiento al pueblo para que acudan a defender a los alzados en armas. Impone, sin embargo, sus condiciones: Todos deberán acudir desarmados; tan sólo llevarán el santo rosario; les acompañarán las imágenes más veneradas de la ciudad; los sacerdotes, religiosos y religiosas deberán encabezar al pueblo y dirigirán las oraciones, pidiendo por el triunfo de la libertad y el restablecimiento de la paz. Apenas transcurrida una hora, acudieron dos millones de filipinos, que rodeando los Cuarteles Generales, hicieron frente a las fuerzas militares del gobierno que, -causa asombro ¿verdad?-, no dispararon un sólo tiro; antes al contrario, sin dificultad alguna se unieron a los defensores de la rebelión. El dictador hubo de huir precipitadamente. Así de arraigada es la fe religiosa de los filipinos, preciado legado de siglo.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    La vida de todo estado de derecho encuentra su reflejo en su ordenamiento jurídico. Pues, bien; en Filipinas este ordenamiento es fundamentalmente hispánico. Durante el régimen español se trasvasaron a Filipinas los Códigos Civil, Penal y Mercantil de España. Al finalizar el dominio español, los nuevos gobernantes norteamericanos no se atrevieron a abrogar estas legislaciones, que, hasta nuestros días, perviven, si bien con las adiciones y reformas exigidas por las circunstancias histórico-políticas del país. Por otro lado, cuando Filipinas establece su primera República en 1898, la dota de una Constitución Política que se inspira en la española de 1876 y en las de varias repúblicas hispanoamericanas. Cuando en 1935, como antesala de nuestra independencia de la Mancomunidad de Filipinas, su nueva Constitución también adopta varios artículados de la Constitución Española de 1931. Un buen número de esas diversas disposiciones constitucionales de cuño hispánico, y sobre todo, su inspiración jurídica hispánica, encuentran vigencia en nuestra actual legislación.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    Hace unos años regresaba yo a Filipinas a bordo de un buque francés. Al día siguiente de zarpar de Marsella, los pasajeros, como es costumbre, comenzaron a trabar mutuo conocimiento. Un profesor japonés se me acercó para presentarse. Nos dimos las manos e intercambiamos tarjetas. Más, cuando este profesor se presentó a otros dos pasajeros japoneses, no se estrecharon las manos, sino que, reverentes, se inclinaron ante sí tres veces. Más tarde, un industrial de Bombay, al presentárseme, también me dio la mano y me entregó su tarjeta. Pero luego, al pretender lo mismo con un funcionario de Nueva Dehli, tampoco se dieron las manos… En cambio, unidas las palmas, las elevaron hasta la altura de la frente y lentamente las bajaron hasta la mitad del pecho, repitiéndolo varias veces.
    Cuando después me encontré con don Reynaldo Bautista, del Ministerio de Trabajo de Filipinas, el único pasajero filipino fuera de mí, me invadió un algo de perplejidad. Me pregunté: “¿Cómo saludar a lo filipino, tal que los otros citados lo habían hecho a lo japonés y a lo hindú?”. No sabía si tocarmen las narices o tirarme de las orejas. Me conformé con darle la mano. En seguida interiormente volví a preguntarme: “¿Es que los filipinos estamos tan desprovistos de personalidad propia que ni siquiera tenemos un saludo típico?” Recordé, entonces, que se me tenía por historiador. A fuer de tal, por tanto, repasé mentalmente las crónicas de mi país al respecto. En efecto, en ellas se nos dice que los filipinos, antes de la llegada e instalación de los españoles en Filipinas, para saludar, juntaban las palmas de las manos, alzaban seguidamente en sentido diagonal hasta la altura de la frente, doblaban la pierna izquierda al mismo tiempo que lentamente se agachaban hasta ponerse en cuclillas. Excuso decir que si hubiera saludado así al paisano Bautista, se habría tronchado de risa o, lo que no hubiese tenido ninguna gracia, me habría arrojado por la borda creyéndose objeto de una burla.
    Todo esto demuestra que en la llamada occidentalización de los países asiáticos, de lo que se trata es de adoptar los modos y usos de Occidente para su empleo ocasional cuando corresponda, demostrando así que se es igual a los europeos y americanos, pero, entre los naturales del país se retiene lo autóctono, que no ha perdido vigencia. Más, no acontece así, con el pueblo filipino. Nosotros hemos adoptado la cultura y la civilización occidentales como de nuestro propio acervo, válidas entre propios y extraños, así en el país o fuera de sus costas. Digámoslo de una vez, la occidentalización del Oriente encuentra su máxima y cabal representación en Filipinas.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    En otra ocasión, esta vez navegando hacia el Japón bajábamos mi mujer y yo por las escaleras del barco para dirigirnos al comedor, cuando sorprendimos a cuatro jóvenes que subían. “Vamos a saludar a estos paisanos míos”, le dije a mi mujer, española de origen. Extrañada me preguntó: “¿Cómo sabes que son filipinos si ni siquiera nos han sido presentados?” Rápidamente la respondí: “Está clarísimo ¿Ves ese rótulo? Dice: Bajada solamente. Y ellos suben!”. Efectivamente, eran cuatro estudiantes filipinos, que se disculparon, diciéndome que, subiendo por aquellas escaleras, se llegaba antes a sus camarotes. ¿Herencia española? Ciertamente. Los japonenes, los chinos, los coreanos, los vietnamitas o los indonesios son incapaces de semejante indisciplina. Ya nuestro héroe nacional, José Rizal, en su novela “El filibusterismo”, pone en boca de un personaje español estas palabras:”¿Queréis que se abra una carretera en España? No hay más que poner un cartel que se diga: Prohibido el paso. Y por allí justamente transitarán todos hasta hacerse camino” Y añadía: “En España el día que se prohiba la virtud, al día siguiente todos los españoles, santos”. Dentro de su hipérbole, las afirmaciones de nuestro novelista son de una realidad innegable. El llamado espíritu de contradicción, que no es más que el culto a la libertad personal frente a todo autoritarismo, es típicamente español. En cuanto a nosotros los filipinos, ya hace tiempo que ha venido a serlo también.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    No hace mucho un prominente filipino hubo de recurrir a los tribunales de justicia para hacer efectivo el cobro de un pagaré que suscribiera un amigo norteamericano, a quien aquél venciera en una partida de bacarrá, en la cantidad de cincuenta mil pesos filipinos. El demandado, que se negaba a pagar lo adeudado, en la vista del juicio, admitió ante el juez que había firmado dicho pagaré, revelando el motivo de haberlo hecho. Entonces su abogado invocó al correspondiente artículo del Código Civil -en este respecto y en muchos otros más, fiel calco del Código Civil español, por la razón ya indicada anteriormente- disposición legal que hace inviable el cobro mediante proceso judicial, de ninguna obligación contraída de resultas de un juego de azar.
    El juzgado se vió constreñido a sostener la defensa del demandado como ajustaba a la ley. Entonces el demandante filipino solicita se le entregue el pagaré. Una vez en su poder, lo hace añicos, mientras decía: “Señoría: Pido que se haga constar en las diligencias que un filipino puede permitirse el lujo de perder cincuenta mil pesos para conocer a un norteamericano sinvergüenza”.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    Cierto magistrado filipino, enojado porque el novio de su hija había enviado la fotografía de ésta a la redacción de un periódico, que patrocinaba un concurso de belleza, para incluirla entre las candidatas, le aconsejó a que retirara dicha fotografía, porque no consentía que dispusiera de ella antes de que fuera marido de su hija. Ya en los recintos de la redacción, dicho magistrado coincidió con un colega suyo, a quien, a preguntas del mismo, le explicó la situación. Sin ningún recato, dicho colega le comentó: “Pues haces muy bien en retirar la candidatura de tu hija, porque, presentándose la mía al concurso, veo difícil que tu hija pueda vencer. ¡Más vale ahorrarse el bochorno de una derrota!” En tono enérgico el magistrado le replicó al instante: “¿Ah sí? Pues mira, no retiro la fotografía. ¡Mi hija será candidata!” A la postre ésta venció. Es que el magistrado se había suscrito al periódico por veinte años, visto que los votos se conseguían en función de suscripciones al periódico. Vuelto a ver su colega, le faltó tiempo para preguntarle: “¿Qué tal el bochorno de tu hija?” Inconfundiblemente hispánico todo ello.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    Cuando hace algunos años se presentó un proyecto de ley en nuestro Congreso Nacional para abolir la enseñanza obligatoria del español en las escuelas filipinas, comparecí en la correspondiente sesión pública, habiendo solicitado un turno en contra. El legislador que presidía la sesión, me preguntó: “¿Por qué se opone usted a este proyecto de ley? ¿Por qué prefiere que continúe la enseñanza obligatoria del español en nuestras escuelas? ¿Es que se enseña el tagálog en los centros docentes de España? Tenemos nuestro idioma propio. Cuidemos de enseñarlo y cultirvarlo, en lugar de imponer en nuestras aulas un idioma extranjero que no tiene nada que ver con nosotros. ¿No le parece a usted que llevo razón?”. Le respondí entonces: “Su señoría dice bien. Tenemos un idioma propio, el tagálog, que debíamos hablar y cultivar. ¿No le parece, por tanto, que deberíamos hacerlo ahora aquí, en vez de emplear el inglés, como lo está haciendo Su Señoría? Accedió a ello, aunque no sé si de muy buena gana. Empecé, entonces, preguntándole en tagálog: ¿Cómo se llama esta prenda?”. Me contestó: “Americana”. Arguyo: “Perdone su Señoría, pero esa palabra es española”. Y proseguí: “Señoría, cuál es el nombre tagálog de esta otra prenda?” Me respondió: “Camiseta”. “Vuelva a perdonarme su señoría, pero esa palabra también es española”. Y así le hice recorrer las demás prendas como pantalón, cinturón, corbata y calzoncillo, que también se llama así tagálog.
    ¿Tiene que ver con nosotros el idioma español? En el Parque de Rizal se pueden leer en sendas placas conmemorativas las traducciones de la poesía última de nuestro hérores nacional realizadas en todos los idiomas principales del mundo. Falta el texto en español. ¿Es que no es este idioma uno de los principales?. Sí, lo es. Se trata únicamente de que Rizal, el héroe, escribió su poesía en español. Como es español se compuso por el joven poeta filipino, José Palma, la letra de nuestro Himno Nacional. También en español se redactó la Constitución de nuestra Primera República, así como los escritos de nuestros más insignes patricios y los documentos más salientes de nuestra historia patria, amén de las mejores producciones literarias de nuestros escritores, tanto en prosa como en verso.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    Por un decreto del que fuera Gobernador y Capitán General de Filipinas, don Narciso de Clavería, los filipinos adoptamos apellidos españoles, que son los de más del noventa por ciento de los filipinos; inclusive, hay quien obstenta como apellidos palabras españolas que no lo son; de ahí, que nos tropecemos con sobrenombres tan peregrinos como bragas, pantalón, campana, jaula, elefante y pájaro. Han pasado años desde entonces, se han sucedido los regímenes políticos, los filipinos nos hemos vuelto independientes, soberanos de nuestros destinos y, sin embargo, no hemos renegado de ese úcase español, retenemos dichos apellidos y a mucha honra. Por eso no extrañe, en un repaso de la lista de los delegados a la Conferencia Afro-Asiática de Bandung, que leamos esta reseña: Birmania – U nu; China – Chou En Lai; India – Jawarharlal Nehru; Thailandia – Wakatayakan; Indochina – Ho Chi Ming; Indonesia – Sukarno; y Filipinas – Carlos Rómulo Peña. ¿No es revelador esta singular variante filipina? Lo mismo acontece con los dirigentes de los países orientales, tales como el Emperador Akihito, de Japón; la Primer Ministro Ali Bhuto, de Pakistán, y el Presidente Suharto, de Indonesia, por citar a algunos, frente al presidente de Filipinas, que se llama Fidel Ramos Valdés, como antes lo fuera la Presidenta Corazón Aquino, sin que tengamos que remontarnos al presidente de nuestra primera República, que se llamó Emilio Aguinaldo.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    El más somero repaso de la toponimia filipina nos brinda un aval más a nuestra respuesta afirmativa a la pregunta que ocupa nuestra atención. Lo inicia el mismo nombre de nuestro país, Filipinas, que se deriva de Felipe, nombre del que entonces fuera Príncipe de Asturias, en cuyo honor se adoptó ese nombre para nuestras Islas. Nos sale, luego, al paso, una letanía de provincias tales como La Unión, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, Nueva Ecija, La Laguna, Camarines, Mindoro y Negros. Nos hacen el encuentro también ciudades y poblaciones como Ballesteros, San Fernando, Solano, San Carlos, San Quintín, San José, Luceno, Valladolid, Mondragón, Getafe, La Carlota, Pontevedra, Victoria, Santa Catalina, Santander, San Luis y Puerto Princesa. Desfilan seguidamente islas como Corregidor, Monja, Fraile, San Miguel y Boca Grande; bahías y golfos de nombre Illana, Lanuza, Coral, San Antonio, San Juanico e Isla Verde; los cabos Engaño, San Ildefonso, Espíritu Santo, San Agustín, Santiago y Coronado, sin dejar de aludir a ríos y cascadas como Chico, Magno, Grande y María Cristina, así como los montes Sierra Madre, Carballo, Cordillera, Halcón y Santo Tomás. Hago referencia al tomo inédito que, sobre el particular, nos dejara aquel gran investigador y buen amigo que en vida se llamó Adolfo Cuadrado Muñiz, del que he extraído tan parcos ejemplos.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    ¿Donde está el “American School” establecido por los norteamericanos en Filipinas hace un siglo? Y, sin embargo, allí permanecen la Universidad de Santo Tomás, la del Ateneo de Manila, el Colegio de San Juan de Letrán, el de San Beda y los femeninos de Santa Isabel, Santa Catalina, Santa Rosa, La Concordia, La Consolación y Santa Rita. Todas son instituciones creadas por españoles durante el régimen español en Filipinas y que, aun en nuestros días, continúan su secular misión docente. Y si nos trasladamos a los exponentes materiales existentes cabe citar las fuentes de Carriedo y de Calderón de la Barca, las murallas de Manila que datan de 1574, la Real Fortaleza de Santiago, el Palacio de Malacañang, residencio oficial del Presidente de Filipinas, la Fuerza de Nuestra Señora del Pilar, en Zamboanga, las catedrales de Manila, Lipa y Calasiado, así como las iglesias de San Agustín, Malate y San Sebastián y los templos provinciales de Paoay, Tanay, Dingras, Lucbán, gumaca, Morong, Barasoain y Naga. ¿Podemos olvidar, acaso, los monumentos a Legazpi y Urdaneta, al Arzobispo Miguel de Benavides, al botánico Sebastián Soler y al Gobernandor General Simón de Anda y Salazar? ¿Y qué decir de esa maravilla mundial que es el órgano de bambú de las Piñas?

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    Los filipinos abrimos los libros de derecha a izquierda, así como leemos horizontalmente de izquierda a derecha, justamente lo contrario a como lo hacen nuestros hermanos orientales. Empleamos el negro para el luto y no el blanco o el amarillo preferido en otras latitudes de Extremo Oriente. En la urdimbre de nuestras danzas y canciones juguetean los fandangos, las habaneras y las jotas, siquiera sea, en palabras del maestro español Cubiles, “con cierta pereza oriental”. Nuestra gastronomía desconoce los platos exóticos de China, Japón y Corea, por ejemplo, a base de serpientes, ratas o monos. Nuestro plato nacional es el cochinillo asado, como se conoce en vuestra Segovia. Nuestra indumentaria típica es, para los varones, la camisa occidental, aunque enriquecida con bordados a mano, y, para las mujeres, la falda larga y la camisa de diseño originariamente valenciano, como lo demuestra la doctora Inés Villas, en su tesis doctoral en la Universidad Complutense, de la que fue primera doctora filipina.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    En Filipinas presumimos de redes ferroviarias; alumbrado eléctrico público y privado, traída de aguas potables; marina mercante; plantaciones de azucar, tabaco, maíz, añil y algodón; observatorio meteorológico; cria caballar y bovina; hospitales, orfelinatos, seminarios, conventos de clausura y colegios y universidades. También contamos con un sistema de seguridad social, con economatos y mutualidades, escuelas de maternidad y óptica, asilos, sanatorios, presidios. Y así se podría prolongar la reseña sin pausa; pero, hagámosla para recalcar que todas estas realidades filipinas son de origen español y datan de siglos.

    Eso queda de España en Filipinas.

    España sigue, pues, presente en Filipinas. Nos lo asegura con mejor acento el bardo filipino Jesús Balmori, que se dirige así a España:

    Reina de los amores y los dolores grandes,
    que por todas las tierras tu habla sonora expandes
    y por todos los cielos prendiste una quimera:
    ¡Aquel tu sol glorioso que ayer se puso en Flandes
    hoy vuelve a ser tu sol, porque está en mi bandera!

    • Erwin José Abcede

      Oh WOW!!! ¡Eso es maravilloso! That’s really getting into detail and well chronicled experiences and events. Muy interesante.

      • Markuva

        Wait. is this a Mexican board? Am I in Antigua, Salvador, chile, Honduras, or Columbia? Am I safe? Get me out of here. I don’t want to end up on the 5 o’clock news a statistic. Help. I speak Tagalog. Manga Kababayan . . . . . I want rice and isda and bagoong.

  • proxy

    Thanks, good article… Do you know any other places that discuss this?

  • Fil-Black-Rican

    Listen, I am not “anti-Filipino” by all means. I just believe the Philippines and Filipinos need to recognize their Spanish cultural past – both the pros and cons – and deal with it.

    Seems to me, this “Filipinos are Asians” obsession is due to the term Asian being identified with the “model minority” rhetoric. However, the truth of the matter is Filipinos are predominantly “brown-skinned” people with Spanish names which usually equates to being mistaken for Mexican. In all due respect, the term Mexican or Hispanic, usually defines a general stereotype quite ‘contrary’ and opposite to the “model minority” description often connected to the term Asian.

    The dog thing was just a “tic for tac” example of how insulting “stereotyping” can be. It was a subliminal rebuttal towards Mr. Torres’ glib and rude example regarding that all Hispanics eat at Taco Bell. Only Mexico is known for its people eating tacos NOT Cubans, Puert Ricans, Central Americans or South Americans, all being “Hispanics”.

    • nold

      I get it bro. The sad part is that recognition is missing today, when I talk about hispanism, I’m tagged as someone apologizing for Spain’s errors or romanticizing the Spanish era, hispanism has nothing to do with Spain anymore, were talking of cultural and historical identity here not of any allegiance. As you said we just have to deal with it, for me we have to embrace it and make other people fall in love with it. There’s something wrong here, like amnesia, were the only one – of all Spanish colonies that have not known how to value our hispanic origins!

    • LaLeydeHerodes

      Being Asian is not an obsession it is a fact because The northernmost group of islands in the Philippines is Batanes which is only 190 kilometers from Taiwan, while the southernmost island of Tawi-Tawi, is a mere 60 kilometers away from Borneo. NOt all Asians look Chinese, just look at the people from India and Laos. No Filipino denies that the Philippines was once under the rule of Spain. But GENETICALLYy, not many have Spanish blood in their veins,. It is a belief to many Filipinos that being a descendant of a Spaniard is carrying that special and superior genes of the people who once ruled the Philippines In the Philippines, very few speak Spanish. Try speaking in Spanish to everyone you meet in Manila. I admit that I eat paella, morcon, escabeche, embutido; however Filipinos also eat bibingka, paksiw, linaga, tuyo ginatan, pansit, bulanglang, pakbet, kare-kare, laing. sinigang and everyday food is eaten with rice. I can’t even pass for Hispanic if I try.

    • Markuva

      I loved that taco bell example. it could have been any americanized hispanic fast food venture named, but taco bell was just one of the big (only? i don’t know) examples of gringo hispanic food – the write could have used any example of hispanic food, but the point of his statement was like this:

      “OH !!! The hispanic world (south and central america) forgot all about Filipinos ”

      The Point? How can the entire hispanic world forget about filipinos ? Isn’t it more likely that a few filipinos have some delusional obsession with wanting to be considered hispanic? Instead of 500 Billion hispanic people forgetting about the Filipinos, wouldn’t it be more likely that a small handful (in proportion to the billions of hispanicos in the Latin world – in central and south america) of misguided filipinos took too much crack one day and looked up at a Taco Bell menu and thought they were Mexican?

      How could 500 Billion central and south american hispanic people be wrong and a few delusional Filipinos be right (< yeah, right. filipinos are hispanic)?

      Ya get me?

      ************THIS IS GOOD. FOLLOW THIS: **************

      A) If you sit a hungry filipino down with a mexican, honduran, salvadorean, chilean . . . and make them eat lunch, are you going to tell me the following foods are hispanic? (being that so many ignorante filipino wannabe hispanics out there are lumping ethnicity with culture with food . . . i'll do the same and jumble it all together)

      i) BAGOONG – shrimp and fish
      ii) PATIS
      iii) Plain sticky jasmine rice
      iv) Plain sticky red rice
      v) BITTER MELON (ampalaya)
      vi) EGG ROLLS (hey muchacho, wanna egg roll ese?)
      vii) PANSIT – (ooh yeah gimme some doze hispanic noodles)
      viii) BALUT (mmm…. just like chimichanga)
      ix) Fermented anything – – –

      OH YEAH !!!!! MMmmmmmmmmm Mmmmmmmmmm good HISPANIC food !!!!!

    • Markuva

      I”m sorry, but no self-respecting Filipino is going to give ear to a “BLACK RICAN” (hahaha) especially if you’re going to try and sound ersatz and pseudo authoritative on the topic of: themselves. I think you might be able to see my other posts on here to tell you how I and countless million other people in my ancestors native geography will tell you.

  • nold

    No hay problemo.

    About the dogs, while it is true that we have some people who eats our furry best friends, they’re confined to those who have a tradition of doing so, like the highlanders for example but majority of Filipinos are outraged by this practice.

    Eating dogs is punishable by imprisonment, so that should reassure dog loving humans that we are indeed kind to our pets.

    • Markuva

      I read the book “DOGEATERS,” don’t sugar coat our dog eating race. I’m proud of it. I’m not going to pretend to be Hispanic. I have no shame in being who I am. I’m not European. I’m not White. I’m not going to pretend to call myself Spanish / Chinese / Hawaiian and be anything I’m not.

      Stop the shame. If Dog Eating was part of your ancestors past then so be it. I’ll take it. I don’t eat burritos, don’t worship maize, and I didn’t see any of my relatives in the movie “APOCALYPTO.”

      M’kay? I don’t glorify in some delusional BS past that calls my grandmother Dona EspanaWannaBeeeta or my make-believe grandfather Juan Valdez.

      I’m quite happy with my ancestral ties to the Ami people in southern Taiwan or Malay people. I’m quite happy eating white jasmine rice everyday or red rice and buko or makapuno or wearing a sarong and sandals . . . and chasing down dogs to eat. I’m proud of the ugly ancestral past. It ain’t Spanish, but it’s somethin’ . . . 😉

      Why? Why obsess and idolize a culture that’s portrayed in the news everyday every single live long day as a wife-beating culture, a drinking tequila culture, a robbing, stealing, invading, raping, murdering, gangsta culture?

      Suit yourself, but seems to me that no amount of paint, tequila, costuming, clothing, cover-upping, pretending, delusionalizing, marking penning, wording, drugging is going to make a scrawny little malay-looking, southeast asian looking, person latino, european, macho, hair-growing, moustachioed or machismoed HISPANIC or white european. Nada. Nada. None.

      No Way Jose. We don’t run for the border out here, muchacho. We only Balikbayan and LBC and boil rice plain (no salsa, pintos, tortillas . . . and hold the tequila, muchacho)

  • Fil-Black-Rican

    Thanks. I seem to have had problems submitting my original comment. It kept saying “duplicated comment” upon my submitting them. I would modify the comment only to being denied again. If you can delete “some” or part (at your discretion) of the comments, it won’t sound so redundant.

    Again, at your discretion of course!

    • Markuva

      Ahem . . . Black Rican . . . you may know this, but there are so many racist filipinos that don’t like blacks or hispanics. You know this, right? They’ll smile to your face, but behind your back they’re calling you “itim” . . . and other awful names in a filipino dialect. I’m sorry but that’s the sad truth.

      Filipinos are told as children to stay away from blacks and hispanics. It’s the truth, the truth, the God’s honest truth – – – in middle and upperclass industrialized nations, Filipino parents steer their children the heck away from blacks and hispanics.

      Kababayan – – – do you not know what I’m talking about?

      Sorry Rican Black. Not a lot of fans as you go up the socio-economic ladder for middle class and upper middle class filipino families. We are told from day one out of the womb to steer clear of you. Sorry, as bad as it is – it’s a reality.

      Steering clear of Blacks and Hispanics is cultural and socio-economic. Depending on the education level of ones parents – will depend on how racist your parents were. No one will admit this to your face. I’m sorry.

  • nold

    You could be right but majority of Filipinos either do not know that they’re hispanic or they’re in denial that they are hispanic. Hispanism has nothing to do with geography – we could be Asians geographically speaking but a glimpse at our culture and history would show a hispano soul.

    Hispanism has nothing to do with Spain today but it has everything to do with who we are, and as someone who had the opportunity to travel abroad, I found out that I could never be oriental [in character at least] because my culture and history would not permit me to do so, not that there is something wrong with embracing the oriental culture but its just not Filipino. We should know how to answer the question, define a Filipino? – and in order to define you MUST identify its characteristics… so far, for me, it all leads back to that ‘hispano’ culture that most of us has been taught not to recognize.

    Fil Black Rican – I consolidated your comments into one message.

    abrazo
    A

    • latinaDE_VERDAD

      just as we in latin america understand that we are a mix of native american, spanish, and african slaves. you are a mix as well of native, spanish, and chinese/malay/indo. (asian) why then do you not embrace it.. i’m really not against any filipino proud of his spanish roots. but the fact is that only 2% have ANY spanish blood at all! and you keep pointing out the spanish words you use. honestly so what. italians french portuguese we all share many common words as we are speaking romantic languages but it doesnt mean we are more related to one or the other. i will tell you my family and i live in the middle east right now for my husband’s work. there are many filipinos in this area. they are the largest minority here i believe. i have friends who are filipina & we have talked about the similarities in our culture as well as the differences. no one denies the spanish influence or denounces it, but i have learned that they really do embrace all their roots and are proud of their country. and when i spend time w. my filipina friends i don’t feel as if i’m w. fellow latinas. b/c the truth is culturally we are not exactly the same. for some reason it seems those filipinos in the US are so quick to define themselves more as hispanic. i know what it is to come to the US and the identity crisis many immigrants or even 2nd generation people have. but there is no need to feel you have to jump in exclusively with any one ethnicity. filipinos are a very unique mix just leave it at that.

      and kumusta? it is not como estas. its like a knockoff.

      • jackelita

        Tienes razon. I’m a Filipina & I also have many friends from Spain & Latin America. At home we practice hispanic culture too coz of our family heritage (my grandparents migrated from Malaga, Spain). Although I can tell that there are some Spanish influence on our culture but there are many differences in hispanic & filipino culture. For one, Filipinos don’t celebrate El Dia de los Tres Reyes Magos. When I was a kid, my parents used to give us presents on 6 Jan & my classmates would only laugh at me when I told them about it. In Filipino culture, there are many things that are Malay & Chinese like feng shui, eating pancit, shomai, some rituals. I don’t have any idea with Malay culture. Typically, Filipinos are more reserved (w/c is very asian btw) while Hispanics are more vocal. Whenever I’m with my fellow Filipinos, I don’t feel the same as if when I’m with my Hispanic friends.

      • LaLeydeHerodes

        Amen to you, so sad that the truth of the matter came from someone who is not a Filipino at all. I worked with Latinos I know the difference in culture. The typical Filipino does not speak Spanish and whatever Spanish words we got from the Spaniards they are not enough for us to easily learn Spanish and certainly cannot understand Spanish unless we studied the language.

      • Markuva

        Filipino culture and hispanic culture are sooo different. Filipinos are not loud or forceful people. We have t his “hiya” culture based on shame. We are nothing like the hispanics on the 5 o’clock news.

        Nothing like that.

    • Markuva

      Who “W-E” are? Sorry, dude. This site is talking about Filipinos. We’re not talking about Puerto Ricans.

      You’re Hispanic. Don’t try to speak for everyone, Rican.

      Get your Rican hands off my Buko. WTF, Rican?

    • Markuva

      So, it’s only the people from the country called the Philippines that have just totally forgotten about being Hispanic, right? I mean, what’s the reason why the rest of the world, the 90% rest of the world forgot, ‘cos you know they forgot too.

      You, a tiny deluded minority, like, the ones on drugs . . . . are the only ones who know this secret we all forgot, that we’re actually pinto bean burrito eating maize worshipping hispanics, but we just forgot. . . . and to think we’ve been sending our BALIKBAYAN boxes to the wrong end of the world and have been eating the wrong kind of fermented stinky foods the whole time, and have been eating dog like the rest of asia when we could have been eating carne asada, tortillas, pintos, and blue corn this whole time?

      Damn !! Can we still keep our coconut milk desserts, rice cakes, noodles, and stinky fermented fish and shrimp stuff?

      Maraming Salamat !!!!!!

  • Fil-Black-Rican

    #
    Fil-Black-Rican, on December 18th, 2008 at 5:27 pm Said: Edit Comment

    People from the Philippines, upon migrating or visiting the U.S., are not used to cultural diversity as is experienced by Americans of Filipino descent. When living in California, you just see the cultural and religious similarities practiced with your Mexican or Hispanic neighbors, friends or co-workers.

    In Mr. Torres’ case regarding his article, you detect his FOBBINESS when referring to Hispanics with Taco Bell. South Americans (Argentines, Chileans, Uruguayans), Cubans, Dominicans and Puerto Ricans do not eat tacos.

    It’s like saying all Asians eat dogs, when in fact that “stereotype” is usually directed to Filipinos, and to an extent Vietnamese and not Japanese, Koreans, Thai, Indians, or Pakistanis. You know what I mean?

    That tells you that Mr. Torres is very, very, very new to the United States and probably does not have a diverse group of friends. Most Filipino nationals are inept to socialize outside thier own circle, and then criticize everyone else with passionate put-downs.

    They fail to realize that they are the fools.
    #
    Fil-Black-Rican, on December 18th, 2008 at 5:31 pm Said: Edit Comment

    In Mr. Torres’ case regarding his article – Filipinos are not Hispanics, you detect his FOBBINESS (for lack of better words and with all due respect) when referring to Hispanics with Taco Bell. South Americans (Argentines, Chileans, Uruguayans), Cubans, Dominicans and Puerto Ricans do not eat tacos.

    It’s like saying all Asians eat dogs, when in fact that “stereotype” is usually directed to Filipinos, and to an extent Vietnamese and not Japanese, Koreans, Thai, Indians, or Pakistanis. The truth of the matter is the vast majority of Filipinos don’t even eat dogs. You know what I mean?

    That tells you that Mr. Torres is very, very, very new to the United States and probably does not have a diverse group of friends with different ethnicities. Filipino nationals are known inept to socialize outside thier own circle, and then criticize everyone else with passionate put-downs. It’s because they are not used to living with white-brown-yellow and black people. It really isn’t Mr. Torres’ fault!

    They fail to realize that they are the fools.
    #
    Fil-Black-Rican, on December 18th, 2008 at 5:34 pm Said: Edit Comment

    You see how ignorant comments like Taco Bell can go both ways?
    #
    Fil-Black-Rican, on December 18th, 2008 at 5:39 pm Said: Edit Comment

    You could detect Jon Torres’ FOBBINESS commenting on Taco Bell and Hispanics. Mexico is only one of 20 “Hispanic” nationalities.

    It’s like Asians eating dogs. We know of only one nation within the continent of Asia who is stereotypically known for eating poodles as a delicacy. Even though a vast majority of Filipinos have never eaten dogs.
    #
    Fil-Black-Rican, on December 18th, 2008 at 5:45 pm Said: Edit Comment

    P.S.,

    In defense of Jon Torres, he probably never has extensively visited any Latin American country for a long period of time. Forgive his ignorance. He’s definitely newly fresh off the boat.

    • Markuva

      MULTICULTURALISM is killing the UK and the United States. Don’t be jealous haters because our country is homogenous and not overrun by violent hispanics. (BECAUSE if the country was overrun with Hispanics, there would literally be blood flowing on every street corner, mass drug shootouts, …. and it would be 100,000 times worse) In defense of Jon Torres, don’t take your half breed self hatred out on a peaceful people. You won’t turn on your TV news programs and hear every hispanic name ending in -ez pronounced in association with murder, homicide, assault, battery, drugs, rape, and robbery – – – –

      Black Rican, no offense, but your ethnic combination is what successful filipino parents have told their children out of the womb to stay away from. Filipinos are for the most part, homogenous and prefer to stay away from Gangbangers – that is the stereotype that hispanics and blacks have in the minds of so many Filipinos. I cannot blame them.

      I’m not fresh off the boat and I applaud the TACO BELL joke. How can you not get the joke? He could very well have said: Oh wait. 90% of the world has “forgotten” that the Philippines is Hispanic.

      So, how in the eff would it happen that 90% of the world forgot instead of a handful of delusional black hispanic wannabes were pushing their delusional wanna-be fantasy on 90% of the world?

      I got the joke. I simply don’t think you guys got it. It went over your head so you’re resorting to ad hominem attacks now. I know who’ll join your Hispanic Crusade, though – – – some gangbangers in economically depressed areas. These are the guys who had little or no access to higher education and perhaps have the literacy level of an elementary school child. Their language is guns and gang banging. They’ll come on board with you Black Rican. These very same alienated and uneducated peeps our parents told us to stay away from. They have no idea who they are, probably have no idea who their parents are because they were abandoned – and they’ll reach for any straws to belong.

      I’m sorry racism exists in the world, but the truth is that nationalities and races exist. MIXED RACES are a fairly new idea – – – made up and mostly pushed by the media to eliminate nationalism, patriotism and pride in one’s RACE.

      Multiculturalism is a lie, a propaganda scheme to confuse the lowest hanging fruit, the weakest links in a chain, . . . . .

      You might be the weak links our parents warned us about . . . but the stronger links won’t let that happen. The world can be a dark place, but some of us have the light – and I’m not talking puti, itim….. :)) Can’t we all just get along even if we’re different much much different than you Black Rican?

  • Island Brown

    The dude who wrote that article “Filipinos are not hispanic” was born and raised “in” the Philippines. That says volumes and certainly explains his ignorance.

    He’s probably one of those Fresh-Boaters who probably only associates with Filipinos and only eats Filipino-food and laughs and has something to say about any other thing “outside” his Filipino paradigm. You know the kind!

    • Gina Mexicoo

      I hate filipino wanna-bes that say that they are “half spanish” or shit. Why don’t they say that they are American or Indonesians when they also colonized the Philippines not just the Spaniards. People like these are not proud to be Filipino. They say that they are spanish when their last name is spaniards. FYI, last names were given by the Spaniards to filipinos since they mostly had common names. That girl is more a slut than a singer or an artist. SLUT SLUT SLUT! Viva Espana! Every country is mixed with different races in theire history and got much influence!!!! But only philippines cant accept them selves as asian and searching a culture how dumb and poore. sorry but thats the thruth u guys didnt make a own a culture ur talking others. Lot of Latinos dislike filipinos bout that!

      • jackelita

        frankly i’m of spanish descent (my grandparents are pure spanish migrated from Malaga, Spain) but our family has taught me to be a proud Filipino. although sometimes i am forced to say my heritage when people question my ancestry coz i look like caucasian gypsy & quite far from malay but if someone will ask about who am i, i say filipino & never half-spanish half-filipino. i have many friends from latin america & spain whom i speak in spanish. i may speak spanish to them but i always tell them that i’m a proud Filipino & nothing more. ur right in saying they don’t like people who are not proud of theirselves. latinos are naturally patriotic & being not proud of one’s heritage & culture is definitely a no-no to them. debemos ser feliz y contenta por quien somos…be happy & proud for who we are, VALE!!!

      • Nicole

        Yes! Filipinos always claim to be part Spanish and Chinese. A lot of Filipinos have SOME Spanish and Chinese blood in them – theres no need to mention it! Just say youre FILIPINO – thats it!! What are you so ashamed of?? Although there are a few that do have a little more Spanish or Chinese blood. My lolo’s literally half Spanish and a lot of my relatives speak Spanish, but I dont have the guts to say Im Spanish Filipino mestiza!

        • De AnDA

          @ Nicole – You can’t blame people from trying to claim their heritage. It can be a source of pride and history and belonging. That’s if if you know how to embrace the advantages. Even Chinese refers to their ethnic backgrounds same with the Kastila, heck, even the Americans. Why do we keep on trying to make an ideology hay out of those who Filipinos who see themselves different? Most of us see no problem with Fil-Am’s, Fil-Brits, Fil-Franco (its cool to be one these days) but a Filipino mentioning that they have some drop of Spanish blood they are immediately denounced as pretenders?

    • Markuva

      Wow, I think you’d be calling an entire nation of people, “THAT KIND.” You do realize you just stuck your foot in your mouth and laid yourself wide open to ridicule. An entire nation of Filipinos (yes, the majority and not the ignorant ones who are on here being delusional about being European White Hispanic or Mexican or Nicaraguan or Honduran or Salvadorean or whatever . . .) is asking, “WHAT KIND?” . . . You’ve got to travel more. Quite simply, you’re in a very small minority that the world looks upon asking, “that guy hasn’t undergone brain surgery, has he?”

      BECAUSE 90% of people currently in the Philippines and half of Daly City and NJ and NYC are like, “what’s wrong with associating with one’s own kind?” MULTICULTURALISM and forced integration has helped no one on the face of the earth. Don’t be a jealous hater.

  • Josie Harris

    Not enough time to finish reading. But, i have a complete researched ….Who are Filipinos? Looking back where the Indian came from….in Asia..Where in Asia….i have the book & history about it.

    If you are interested to talk to me …i will be in San Pedro, Laguna on the 2nd week of October.

    Please email me. & thanks

    • matanglawin

      I would like to comment on FILIPINO ARE NOT HISPANIC. The writer was so confused with his litany of facts that went wayward. He admits of Hispanic influence but refuse to admit the influence of spaniards and the drops of bloods that dominate most part if not all of the philippine island. We had been colonized by spain for more than 400 hundred years and sold to the americans for $35M. Maybe the writer doesnt know how to speak tagalog or any of its dialects or maybe he dont even have the droplets of blood in his veins. I envy him he survived the mixes of race. I understand him to be aeta, mangyan, ibatans, and other ethnic race of this country. I do not deny that i am a FILIPINO but to say completely that I have no roots from HISPANIC influence is hypocricy and BASURA (the word we borrowed from spanish language). Maybe he doesnt know how to say KUMUSTA (Como esta?). Being a Filipino serves our flag of identity but to say we are not hispanic, chinese, american, etc. of origin is a pride concealed in waters a half-inch deep. – let us stop glorifying ourselves with reasons that runs out of logic.

      • Ako Si Gundam

        Ah, a tagalista. You do know that we’re experiencing colonization as we speak: Tagalog colonization. The mere use of the word “dialects” smacks of racist condescension.

        Let me ask you? What is a Filipino, then? Does it refer to our pre-Hispanic heritage? Does it include all ethnolinguistic groups (Tagalos, Ilonggos, Ivatans, Tausuga)? Is it inclusive of all native languages or just Tagalog? And does everybody have to be animist or Muslim?

        • Markuva

          I agree with you if where you’re going with your thread is that the quote unquote filipino has nothing to do with the culture and race of our country at all – – – especially because that term only referred to the colonizers from or representing the king and queen from europe.

          I guess your question would make more sense if it asked: so, what is the most authentic past of the people who inhabit what is now called “the Philippines?”

          It’s what the country and its people can come together and agree up on – – – (and HINT: it ain’t a) European b) it ain’t Mexican, Honduran, Nicaraguan, Salvadorean, Chilean, Argentinian, . . . you get the picture)

          Many like myself favor the inclusion of the sanskrit, the muslim, the sultanates, the animism, the Ami Tribes, the bayan-bayan alibata . . . that stuff: batik, balisongs, lambanog, nara wood, all of that really great malay / southeast asian stuff that is not a “FORCED down our throats INTEGRATION” of white european culture that doesn’t fit well, looks uncomfortable on, and makes you sweat looking at it (or like one would shiver viewing an eskimo in a bikini on a glacier or an sub saharan african in a parka).

          I agree that dialect smacks of racist condescension, because I was taught in a socio-linguistics class that people consider a a spoken communication as a LANGUAGE only if it’s backed by an army and a navy. . . .

          This whole colonial cultural confusion should have been nipped in the bud a long time ago. I always use the example of Georgia (in the former USSR) – – they tore down the statues of Lenin and Stalin. However, no one tore down the churches and no one removed their Latin slave names (as was required by European white man decree in the 1500s?). My friend and I were so puzzled when we were discussing how many black people have kept their slave names. . . .

          So, what’s your opinion ? What are the answers you have to your own questions?

      • De AnDA

        @ Gundam – Those are the right questions that needs to be answered. Agoncillo in his book already said its imposible but I say, if we base our historical definition of what “Filipino” truly is, only then would we begin to understand how we became “Filipinos”. Problem is that some people feel that the more “aboriginal” they get, the more “Filipino” they become.

        • Markuva

          Speaking of Aboriginals – – negritos were aboriginals in what is called “the Philippines” However, racially the closest cousin of the quote unquote Filpino (racially, DNA wise) is the Ami people (the Taiwanese “ABORIGINAL”). Our languages are mutually intelligible.

          Yay hooray for southern Taiwanese aboriginals (formosa). Negrito aboriginals – no. Southern Taiwan / Formosa – yes. Aboriginal is ok if you’re talking about the Ami.

          I love filipino / malay names. I’m not a fan of hanging onto the conqueror, keeping my slave name (hahaha. the european white man conqueror).

          Yes – to the bayan-bayan alibata, deep tagalog, the Ami people . . .

          Filipino is a term that only applied to Conquerors – natives weren’t referred to as quote unquote filipinos.

          so, yes – being more SOUTHERN TAIWANESE / MALAY would be more accurate, more fitting . . . . but not Negrito aboriginal, no – the majority of Filipinos do not look like that.

    • Markuva

      You do realize this history you speak about was mostly written by Caucasians or Filipinos who were brainwashed, right? I’m here in the states and everyone in academia knows that there isn’t enough research or published material on the Philippines. The field is wide open for someone to make a name for themselves, much like if someone were to find out what happened to the Mayans (since we’re on a Hispanic thread). Just because you have a “BOOK” doesn’t mean much. Filipinos aren’t HISPANIC – please don’t be one of the deluded.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: