Simbahan sa Loay

Is built on an elevated plain, when I got to its grounds there were children playing on its basketball court – but even with this activity the barrio had a very relax and quite environment. Coming from the Clarin house I had to climb stairs of a hundred steps. After catching my breath I went straight inside the church, it was perfect time to pray, I was completely alone, not a soul in sight.

The façade is being cemented on the side using hollow blocks but the original facade could still be seen, according to the book Philippine Churches it was finished in 1822 with semicircular arched main entrance at the first level, rectangular windows on the second level and a low triangular pediment topped by allegorical figures of faith, Hope and Charity.

The pulpit has a tornavoz or portavoz which is a sounding board built on top of the pulpito to amplification purposes – necessity is indeed the mother of all invention. Loay was a Recollect mission, and like Baclayon which became theirs, the church is filled with icons of their devotion. These pulpito’s once useful structures are no longer used, seeing it makes me imagine how mass was once like and I’m glad to see that most are left standing.

The ceiling is painted with murals by Ray Francia in 1927; he must’ve been a very busy man since he had several works of this kind all over the island during his days. There is pipe organ which was installed in 1841, I don’t know if it’s still working but this musical instrument definitely needs some restoration.

The octagonal bell is just a few feet away from the church, unlike other bell towers this one have a domed roof. What was previously a convent is now a beautiful school; the Holy Trinity Academy was founded in the mid 1950’s.

The Church of the Holy Trinity is about 18 kilometers from Tagbilaran.

Loay church

Loay church

Bas Relief that can be found in the bell tower

Bas Relief that can be found in the bell tower

An example of a good restoration job, while the roofing was upgraded, the original building was left untouched, preserving its architectural integrity

An example of a good restoration job, while the roofing was upgraded, the original building was left untouched, preserving its architectural integrity


2 responses to “Simbahan sa Loay

  • I remember that church in Loay | With one's past...

    […] I remember visiting the church of Loay back in 2009. Not as old as Baclayon and Loboc’s (completed around the 1820′s) but definitely unique in its architectural form—I’ve seen nothing like it in the region. The frontage is most interesting. Historian Benjamin Layug describes it having “an inner and an outer three-level portico-facade with semicircular arched main entrance at the first level, rectangular windows on the second level and a low triangular pediment topped by allegorical figures.” […]

  • Traveler on Foot

    We missed a lot in Bohol when we took the guided tour. We did not see this part of Bohol. Thanks for sharing.

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