Category Archives: Bataan

Bahay-na-Bato: Always the Haunted Houses

 

“The town’s Antillean houses were massive but refined, elegant.The builders were not cutting corners. They were out to impress!” These days they’re all gated, almost hidden, with only caretakers (like that lady) for residents.

I recently watched a GMA Front Row about the ancestral houses in San Miguel, Bulacan. “Front Row: Ang Misteryosong Lumang Bahay ng San Miguel Bulacan” was uploaded in Youtube October last year. I’m not sure when it aired on TV.

 

I wasn’t surprised that the stories were, again, about trifling ghost stories.

Filipino TV producers and writers are obsessed with haunted houses. Good for ratings—terrible for the already underappreciated bahay-na-batos.

Manuel, grandson of Doña Crispina de Leon (sister to former first lady Trinidad Roxas) said the, “house reflects the rich history of this town…it shows that even during those times there were cultured, educated people and entrepreneurs…movers of the town’s small economy.”

He said not once did he ever seen a ghost. Manuel spoke of the house’s colorful past. He took the focus away from it being jammed with ghosts.

All the other caretakers spoke of their scary experiences.

The featured De Leon house was where Gregorio del Pilar slept before living Bulacan to head north.

Teodoro M. Kalaw said it was the wish of the builders that their houses continues to be inhabited and appreciated by generations to come.

Our tangible heritage are not just spaces where horror films gets staged. They were built to last for “US” to live in, to celebrate.

Not long ago, while walking around the Dominican’s retreat house in Nasugbu, I overheard teenagers chuckle. “Ay dito yun, eto yun!” one of them somewhat reenacted a scene. Curious, I asked what’s going on. “Sukob po, yun movie ni Chris Aquino, dito po s’ya kinasal.”

Now, the Chapel is not a heritage structure. But my point is that the young would most likely recall a horror flick scene over the history of a place.

We once went to Wisconsin to buy clothes and electronics. This US state have low sales tax and great bargains from “outlet” shops.

I was looking for an IC recorder. A Sony attendant recommended one, “this model is very popular for ghost and paranormal people, y’know”.

Interesting sales pitch.

We have a different culture compared to westerners. In the US, old hotels rumored to be haunted gets more reservations.

Their notorious haunted houses are not adversely affected by its reputation.

On the contrary, Filipinos steer clear of places believed to be haunted.

A few years ago, someone looking for a place to rent in Manila sought my advise regarding an old apartment. He wanted to know if it had a history of being haunted!

In San Ildefonso, the “bahay na pula” was demolished in 2016. Not a whimper was heard. I didn’t even heard of it until a friend told me.

For most people, even local historians, it’s not only haunted, its “dark” past makes them want for it to just go away. They don’t want anything to do with it.

The house was one of the many sites where “comfort women” were raped during WWII.

A blogger friend told me that Engr. Acuzar allegedly bought the house for his Bataan beach resort.

But is it not better that it remain there to educate the young?

If we follow the proponents of the demolition’s logic, we should build on top of Bagumbayan. Ensure no trace of its past remains. No monuments, nothing. Luneta was where Filipinos got shot and guillotined! Let’s build an SM mall and a dozen Jollibee on its very ground!

—-

The last time I saw San Miguel was four years ago. My wife’s family is from nearby San Rafael. The town is a short jeepney ride away.

I remember witnessing two tricycle drivers fight MMA-style when I came to see the bahay-na-bato(s). I thought that’s a bad omen (there was also a bit of rain that day!).

True enough—it was.

I failed to inspect any of the famed houses up close. I viewed all of them from the street. No one allowed me in, not one caretaker!

The town’s Antillean houses were massive but refined, elegant. The builders were not cutting corners. They were out to impress!

San Miguel’s the biggest cluster of bahay-na-bato that I have seen in the province.

Owners are struggling financially maintaining their inherited properties. They’re not given financial and technical support but are told by government and public to hold on to it.

I know of one case in Laguna where the owner just decided to sell the house to free himself with what seem to him a lifelong encumbrance.

I always thank caretakers and owners I meet. What they’re doing is a difficult task. They’re not only preserving the memory of their forebears but the historical identity of us all.

—–

To be clear, I remain a fan of GMA 7 docus. I believe we’re in the golden era of Filipino documentaries. In my mind, they’re the best at it. But I’ve seen enough haunted houses that features our bahay-na-batos.

Time to make something else. Leave our old houses alone please.

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Transplanted Bahay-na-Batos in Las Casas of Acuzar

Before visiting Bataan, my stand on relocating heritage houses is that of a purist advocate.  Keep them where they were constructed. If the town and the inheritors choose not to care for them then let them die nobly in situ.

Physically moving them is violating the very meaning of heritage conservation.

But after seeing Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar I’ve had a change of heart—not a radical departure from my original opinion but a change none the less. I still believe that we should avoid the “relocation” of bahay-na-batos but this option should not be out of the table.

Projects like the Las Casas of Acuzar do serve some good. In a time where even historically popular heritage houses are not spared from ruin, such projects has become necessary evils.

The fear that Acuzar’s out to get every single bahay-na-bato in the country is baseless. He handpicks them based on historical, architectural and cultural merits. Bad news for those who wants to dispose their ancestral houses in exchange for some cash. Although I heard that the resort plans to add around 20 more houses.

To be honest, I don’t like the idea of collectors plucking heritage houses away from where they were originally built but people like Acuzar would not invest on acquiring heritage houses if it weren’t for the negligence of our historic town’s people and government.

But if there’s anything we can learn from this strange project (who would have thought that you can transport an entire baha-na-bato?) it is that it can be done. Acuzar even laid out the plan how to make them tourist attractions!

If our heritage agencies would think outside the box for a moment, maybe they should do an Acuzar, salvage threatened Spanish-Filipino colonial houses then put them in an area where they can be viewed by Filipinos.

The reality is that our laws are not going to protect our tangible heritage. If you believe that it can, well, you must be in la-la land. Look, never in my life that I imagined the Alberto house of Biñan would end the way it did. Go to Biñan and see for yourself, if you’re feeling more adventurous, go to San Nicolas Manila, even in our provinces that are fast developing. We’re losing so many, so fast!

The misconception in Biñan is that because Acuzar came to the owner to buy the house he then decided to get rid of it. The truth was that the house was decaying for decades—no funds, no assistance from both local and national government. Only when it was literally gradually caving in that the present owner sought the help of Acuzar.

When a group of construction workers started dismantling the house it caught the mainstream and social media’s attention. As I expected, just like in FPJ movies when cops shows up after the gunfight is over, everyone became fanatical heritage advocates especially the local politicos.

In Bagac I heard some interesting stories behind the houses and how they end up in all places, a coastal resort.

The Casa Mexico, a sophisticated bahay-na-bato with delicate barandillas, a graceful front staircase (imagine ascending to the piso principal, the main sala today, what sight that must have been), stylistic balustrades, creative carvings all over—and this you better believe, the entire house was retrieved from a junk shop. Sold like worthless scrapings.

The neglect some of our people have towards our tangible heritage is just so infuriating. But this mirrors how we value ourselves as a people, and this utter disrespect for the past is an expression of how we lost our identity as Filipinos.

What’s even more absurd is that the very people, family members that shares direct lineage to the people who built these houses are the ones who gives these houses up so easy.

Like the house from Lubao, built by the sugar planter Don Valentin Arrastia in the early 1900’s. It’s a delightful example of Capampangan wealthy living in the countryside. The elaborate ceilings, its elegant chandeliers and its solid wooden floors—it is so elegant. A few years ago it was faithfully reconstructed using the same materials from the house here in Bagac—this one’s very eclectic—and historic, to say the least.

Why did President Macapagal Arroyo, a Lubao native, did not help restore this house escapes me. Her father was helped by the Arrastia’s in his early education. It was a house his father must have adored.

An article I found in one of the printed guides in Las Casas has this moving story as recalled by a granddaughter of the Don Valentin. In it she narrates her family’s memorable experiences around the house. The kind of stories you hear from people who had a great childhood. Then much to her surprise, during a recent visit to Lubao she found an empty lot.

I’m surprised that she was surprise the house is gone. I think for a precious physical connection you share with your ancestors you should check the house they built for the family from time to time?

But what do I know, these are their stories. At least they can still visit their abuelos home in Bagac and perhaps swim in the nearby beach. Leave town and not worry about the house.

If my memory serves me right, Don Valentin’s house in Lubao was still there when I saw the town for the first time in 1998.

When I visited Unisan a few years ago, my friend Pepe Alas, toured me around his hometown. He showed me where the Maxino house once stood. Pepe recalls how it used to look like inside and out, how he and his childhood pals would rent computer games in its ground floor.

The Maxino’s were murdered during a house break in. Of course the house is rumored to be haunted. I’m sure it was but I doubt it if the ghosts of Don Antonio’s family relocated to Bagac after the transfer.

After that holiday in Unisan, I tried to look up pictures of the house on line and in some of my books, found some references but no pictures. So I gave up and just left everything to my imagination.

Well, this visit to Las Casas was the opportunity I have been waiting for. Here I finally saw the house that left Unisan.

It is the first bahay-na-bato in Unisan-and most likely the first in the province of Tayabas (now Quezon, tomorrow who knows?) to have been uprooted and transplanted.

The house now is Café Marivent in Las Casas Filipinas de Acuzar.

Casa Bizantina on the background

Of course a visit to Las Casas is not complete without dropping by the Casa Bizantina, originally from San Nicolas Manila.

How this massive historical house that stood for more than a century in Calle Madrid ended up in Bagac is somewhat shady. It was uprooted and transferred without the local government contesting it?

We’re talking about Manila here; they’re the worst in protecting heritage structures—I think I just answered my question.

I have visited Casa Bizantina numerous time. One time, I went inside. I’ll never forget the pitiable tenants leasing small bed spaces and jam-packed rooms in the massive bahay-na-bato. A lady I spoke with told me that there are more than 20 families living in the casa!

Those people knew little of the house’s history but I remember hearing from one of them that the “City Hall” has sent people to tell them that the house would soon be taken down. If this is true then, no, I’m sure this is true, It’s not surprising that historic district is losing century old houses.

We have mad people running the asylum.

Casa Bizantina used to house the Instituto de Manila, now the University of Manila, before it transferred to Sampaloc. One day I hope someone from that school would write a complete history of this splendid mansion.

Due the popularity of the movie Heneral Luna, the Casa Luna was a hit among the visitors.

There was a tour of the house when I passed by so I decided to join. It was informative and entertaining. I was observing those in attendance and it was satisfying to see that these people has travaled quite a distance just to learn and see these glorious treasures of our past.

The house was built by the wealthy Novicio’s in the mid-1800’s in Namacpacan, La Union. Local politicians would later rename the town Luna after the prominent patriotic family. Ironically, they forgot to conserve the house of the family they named their town after.

My suggestion is for them to get their old name back, drop Luna, they don’t deserve it.

Transferring building materials was actually a practice before. The idea is not new and has actually been recorded in the past. In some cases, entire house were relocated piece by piece. True to the spirit of “bayanihan” where townsfolk lifted bahay-kubos to new locations, Filipinos also did the same with bahay-na-bato.

An example of this is Casa Meycauyan, which was originally from San Fernando Pampanga before it was brought to Bulacan. It must hold the record of being the only bahay-na-bato that has been transplanted twice in two different centuries!

This activity, although not widespread back in the day, goes to show how good the materials were. As they call it then and now, materiales Fuertes—built to last forever.

The green painted Casa San Miguel

Casa Bizantina again, this time with Korean tourists who seem to be all over the place.

The houses from Jaen and Mexico, not the country, the Capampangan town.

They call this area Paseo de Escolta. Recreation of a portion of the old Spanish Escolta in Manila.

Rails are being laid down for the tramvia.

Casa Mexico. The house that they found in a junk shop. Faithfully rebuilt based on the original.

The Casa Novicio (Luna) tour. The film, Heneral Luna, must have inspired them to come here. Some scenes from that film was actually shot here.

Good to see these kids getting interested in our history. Their facebook after this for sure would be flooded with their selfies with the houses as backdrop!

Another house from Jaen. I think those folks from Nueva Ecija doesn’t give a rat’s ass about their heritage

A Spanish Filipino house from Candaba

The Casa that Don Maxino built in Unisan


Kilometer Zero of Bagac, Bataan’s Death March

The Kilometer Zero marker of the Bataan Death March

Last Sunday I visited the Bataan Death March’s Kilometer Zero marker in Bagac. These obelisk white markers line the road side from San Fernando all the way to Bataan, in Bagac is where it starts.

I intended to climb Mt. Samat, to see the “Dambana ng Kagitingan,” but the weather has not been kind. So I observed it (passing it from Balanga to Bagac) from a distance, the hill and its giant white cross. The shrine was commissioned by President Marcos, he was himself a soldier in that war.

The journey to Bagac was long but comfortable. From Cubao, I alighted in Balanga. The trip lasted about 3.5 hours. Passing the towns of San Fernando, Bacolor, Guagua and Lubao in Pampanga; Hermosa, Orani, Samal and Abucay in Bataan.

I’ve been reading a couple of local books about the war in Manila and neighboring provinces lately. This readings relit my curiosity in local WWII accounts. One that I delight in is Pacita Pestaño Jacinto’s “Sleeping with the Enemy,” a diary of a newlywed, educated woman caught in a ruthless occupation. I had the book with me during this trip.

The author wrote for several newspaper and magazines, working along some of the best writers of her generation: Jose Garcia Villa, Salvador Lopez and Teodoro Locsin, to name a few.

The diary (available in National Bookstore for P215. Note, this is the abridged version) provides the reader a rare glimpse into the lives of the Filipinos in Manila during the war. Moving were the accounts of how ordinary people tried to live normal lives in an environment encircled by death and ruin.

The Bataan Death March has come to symbolize the great defeat that took away the invisibility cloak of the Americans. To many, the resistance in Bataan & Corregidor was the last dash of hope. When the defenders capitulated, with MacArthur fleeing in a sub down to Australia, it was the biggest let down.

Hence the expression you hear to this day, “sinuko na ang Bataan,” which means selling out, if not, unnecessary giving in to disadvantageous demands.

But there’s no doubt that the Filipinos and Americans who fought and defended Bataan did so with great valor. Their sacrifice must never be forgotten.

In Pacita Pestaño Jacinto’s diary, she wrote of the surrender, “tonight is like no other night we have passed. The silence is like a pall… This once, the Japanese radio has told the truth, Bataan has fallen. What else is there to say.

* * *

War is cruel, there’s nothing like it my Father always reminds us. His stories about the war were so frightening that when he first told me these they gave me chills. I remember having nightmares!

These accounts along with others come in handy when I get agitated and stressed by the ups and downs of this life. They mean nothing compared to the hardship my Father’s family, and so many Filipinos, went through during the war.

It can be argued that a generation that went through war is  greater than a generation who never had one.

I believe they are—without a doubt. They have a deeper perspective in life, they understand how to struggle, to live.

WWII is recent past, there are still people who lived through it around us. But how many still remembers? How many of us asked them about it? How many read about these events in history books?

Not too many I think.

—–

How to get to Bagac, Bataan’s “Death March Kilometer Zero marker”:

  • In Cubao, take Bataan provincial buses (like Genesis) to Balanga. Fare is currently P200
  • Go down in Balanga “Terminal”
  • Take a jeep to Bagac. Fare is P45.
  • If the jeep driver, as I’ve experienced, is not familiar with the “Kilometer Zero” marker, go down in Bagac town proper and hire a tricycle. This should cost you P30-P50.

Revisiting Corregidor

Been busy the past few weeks. Things I do now eats up a lot of my time. I no longer get to travel much. So I usually (even with friends) pass up travel opportunities. Budget is tight and there are far more important things to be concerned with is my alibi these days. But there are exemptions, of course, invitations I can’t say no to. Like this request from a brother who wanted to see Corregidor. He wanted to see it before going back stateside. This year being his last tour of duty with US military he wanted to visit what he calls the “Rock”. He’s been to Hawaii’s Pearl Harbour, so I guess this completes his pilgrimage of sorts.

He’s as crazy as I am when it comes to history but his expertise is in the American part of our history. He believes America brought us closer to the ideals political democracy. We don’t agree on a lot of issues, obviously, but this passion for the past has brought us closer. We tolerate each others’ opinions and we enjoy debating over a cup of coffee (we can literally go straight for 4-5 hours discussing historical items, this is our version of “catching up” with lost time!).

We woke up around 5 am and started preparing for the trip. We commuted to Manila and was in the Sun cruises compound before 7 am. Since we don’t have reservations, we were what people there called “chance passengers”. We have to wait for people to cancel or not show up. It was a “full tour” a staffer told me. So I was a bit worried that we might not get on a boat to Corregidor. The first time I went to Corregidor they accommodated more tourist because the boat they used was bigger. This time it was much smaller. I was told that during weekdays Sun cruises only utilize these boats. Since there’s only one tour during weekdays, tourist crowds the first and only tour.

The boat had a mix of foreign tourist on board. Aside from Americans, there were a lot of Japanese. At first I thought that these people would stir clear from Corregidor, they got beaten here pretty bad, but then I realize that their the kind of people that would go and pay their respects to their war dead regardless where the place is. I remember that small cemetery in Muntinlupa where there are Japanese regularly making the pilgrim to that isolated small garden. I can’t help but admire these people. They have good memory when it comes to their national history. We won and forgot about our heroes, they lose but never forgot about the sacrifice of their young men. We can learn something from them.

I thought I’m going to have to talk a lot about what happened in Corregidor. Not the case. Turns out that what I know is not even half of what my brother knows about the battle of Corregidor and Bataan (pronounced Bat’an by Americans). So the tour guide became the tourist in Corregidor. Aside from showing him the Spanish Navy’s battleship mast that was made into a flag pole for the stars and stripes near the old Spanish lighthouse, I hardly contributed any new information to my brother!

The suffering the defenders of Corregidor went through was unimaginable. Being part of the tour makes you respect more what those brave soldiers did. Corregidor and Bataan were the last to be surrendered to the Japanese. The island was where Quezon was inaugurated for his second term (him and Erap were the only presidents that had been sworn to office outside Manila). The Malinta Tunnel became bomb shelter, hospital and residence. The network of tunnels inside Malinta is extensive. So much history in such a small piece island. Just imagine 4000 Japanese men died during the American take over.  Most of them refusing to surrender were burned alive.

It was only in the 1980’s that the location of the Japanese graves was revealed to the Japanese government. For some reason, the location of the mass grave was withheld from the Japanese until that decade. Why the Philippine and American government concealed that location is a mystery. The Japanese was allowed to construct a garden for their dead near where their soldiers were collectively  buried. The Japanese visitors can be seen here offering prayers and incense to a stone goddess about 8 to 10 feet tall.

As me and my brother continued exchanging historical anecdotes we often found ourselves pausing to reflect on some interesting places that catches our attention. Like this gunnery where Japanese letters are etched on the wall. We took photos of it as he wanted his Japanese wife to see it. I was reminded that the island is still surrounded by explosive ammo. I think it was last year when the current President requested help in disposing these dangerous cache of ammo. He made that request to Obama while he was in the White House.

The island is now densely forested. It is as if nature is taking the island back. According to the tour guides, the islands were reforested because almost all of its trees were struck down by bombs. I’m sure Corregidor must be one of the most bombed place in world history. How soldierssurvive the tumultuous years, when the island was relentlessly shelled, is something I can’t get my mind to imagine. It must have been one hellish and awful existence!

The tour and most of the literature about the island concentrates on the role it played during the pacific wars. Hardly ever mentioned is what was life like before the American came. Believe it or not there were several thriving barrios around the island during the Spanish times. The fishing barrio of San Jose is located north (location of bottomside today) of the island. It sits right beside the surf and had a church, a convent, a school (Escuela de Nuestra Señora del Carmen), a market and a small plaza (there was even an ice plant in the island that employed locals). When the Americans came they added two elementary schools and a secondary school. And of course, their living quarters. The schools here are the first ever American public schools in the islands. I’m glad to see that the old Filipino Spanish church was reconstructed (entirely faithful to the original building) reminding tourist’s that the islands past  goes beyond the pacific war.

Along with Manila, Corregidor was the only other Philippine territory under Spain that was attacked by all of its enemies in the pacific. First was this guy Li ma hong. The ambitious Chinese had his eyes on Manila and with his ships and 3000 men launched successive attacks against the capital from Corregidor. He was defeated by the Juan Salcedo and his men. The galant young captain was summoned from Ilocos to defend Manila. And he did just that. Limahong and his forces was chased up to Pangasinan by the Spanish and their local allies. Without the ships that brought them here, some say, Limahong’s men settled in Pangasinan and intermarried with the locals.

Then came the war with the Dutch. The most extensive Philippine war that never made the books. Olivier de Noort was defeated by Spanish galleons converted to battle ships. Manila’s victory was short of a miracle. Those who fought sincerely believed in their hearts that our Lady was with them. After this historic naval battle, Manila decided to create a squad permanently posted in Corregidor to guard it at all times. The reason why I believe this war against the Dutch must be taught in school is that in all of the battles that took place there were large contingents of natives fighting alongside the Spanish. On all of these skirmishes (the last being the Battle of Playa Honda where the Dutch blocked the entrance of all vessels to Manila) the Dutch were defeated. Could you just imagine how many native Filipinos fought in these series of battle with the Dutch? If the Dutch won, we’ll all be familiar with pale lager and not pale pilsen, San Miguel beer would’ve never been the national beverage instead, we’ll be drinking Heineken! We would’ve been “going Dutch” in no time.

Looking back, without the Dutch attacks, Manila would’ve never had a “La Naval” tradition. We must remember that the first devotees were those who took part in the battles to keep Manila Spanish. Most of them native Filipinos that honestly believed in their hearts that by defending Manila they doing just service for their country, their motherland and the Catholic church. The Brits came later and held the capital hostage for three years. The Americans before the turn of the century, and the Japanese. All of these invaders made use of Corregidor for some reason or another.

Well, I guess I should write a separate articles about all of these.

Below are some of the photos I took that day:

That’s smog. One day we’ll all just choke in the metro. When I was still in my teens I imagined myself residing in one of those towers so I can see the sunset going down Manila bay.

I think that’s MOA but with all that smog I could be wrong.

They say the Japs were the ones that dug those caves. They made these area near the port their temporary submarine base.

The islands port. In this area, MacArthur left the country for Australia. Remember the “I shall return”, he said that to Wainwright here along with the promise of promoting him when gets his ass back.

I think these are Korean letters. Possibly by those who fought alongside the real Japs – but then again these could be just graffiti from Korean tourist!

Mi hermano inspecting a WWII relic. These heavy artillery are unbelievable. Makes you think if the Americans prepared for war long before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. These are massive armaments man!

I found this flag near the Japanese shrine where most of the Imperial army men were buried. They say this was the Japanese flag in the island. I’m sure most of those who wrote here died in the island. There was less than a dozen Japanese soldiers that survive the so called liberation of the island.

This baby right here sunk countless ships before heavy Japanese bombardment took it out. These was installed here in the early 1900’s. I’m sure these were not brought here to scare pirates and foreign fishing boats. The Yankees knows somethings up ahead otherwise they would have not prepared this well. If the Spaniard armed Corregidor like what these people did, it would’ve taken them a long time to capture Manila.

My brother staring at the tail of the island of Corregidor. Somewhere near the “tail” is the air strip of the island.

December 2011


Heritage Promotion and Casas Moved to Bataan

I’ve seen similar projects promoting historical sites outside the country. Raising the awareness of the people that these places exist plays a major part in the whole conservation effort. Educating the mass on the value of historical sites would not only increase tourism, by doing so we are also encouraging our fellow Filipinos to take a personal stake in protecting these historical gems. People would naturally care for something that they know belongs to them and their children’s children. Who wouldn’t want to preserve their family’s legacy? Our cities and towns architecture and history deserves protection by responsible and controlled development. When we improve our districts, there should be consideration and respect towards our heritage. Because once we demolish houses, buildings and bridges, we can never reproduce them; we can never get them back. Depriving the future generations in savoring what our unique history has to offer.

I was surprised to read that there are several popular heritage conservationists that are voicing their opposition against the Acuzar project. Personally, I prefer to see old houses restored in their original place, this is the most ideal situation as it retains the history and character of the town. Who wouldn’t want it? But the realities of our times has deemed otherwise, we are fast losing these treasures to an unconcerned government and to families who inherited these Antillean houses, many no longer have the means to sustain their ancestors mansions-changing family fortunes has had a profound effect on them and its understandable why it’s tempting to sell, the land under these noble houses. You see, these houses would be discarded because buyers are not after the aging decrepit abode but the expensive earth beneath. So what can we do about it? We certainly can’t match their buying power; we are left with very little option.

This is the reason why I accept, with mix emotions of anger and joy, the Bataan project of the San Jose Builders. Some call it a vanity project, collecting historic houses like stamps, worst they say is that it’s being moved to a place where it doesn’t belong but at least someone’s doing something more than rant and complain. Unfortunately, like what that Rolling Stone song said, you don’t always get what you want – we are faced with dilemmas that are not in the best means of heritage conservation as a whole. We either bring them somewhere or let them perish. Such is the case of that old Alberto house in Biñan. I had a chance to interview Gerry, descendant of Alberto (Rizal’s uncle). He enumerated a number of problems facing the huge mansion, now slowly deteriorating (even the old portraits has been damaged by the leaking roof). He has decided to sell the property but he intends to transfer the house in Bataan. The place has so much history attached to it that he can’t imagine just letting a demolition crew bring it down. He has long been in contact with Acuzar and Ambeth Ocampo (even showed me the email) and their idea appeals to him. From the looks of it, Biñan’s grandest house, so well known that even dignitaries paid courtesy visits when they’re in town, would soon be part of Las Casas Filipinas in Bataan.

Its heart breaking to hear such stories, sometimes it feels like there is no more space for these magnificent relics of our glorious past.


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