Category Archives: Bohol

I remember that church in Loay

Nothing could be more dispiriting to a heritage advocate than seeing centuries old churches turned into piles of rubble. I don’t know what to make out of this cataclysmal tremor. Maybe I was so used to seeing people dismantle historic religious structures that I never thought that God could take them away too.

Loay Church after the giant earthquake. The facade has completely collapsed under its own weight. Gone are the magnificent facade (Photo courtesy of http://www.gmanetwork.com/)

Internet has some unbelievable images of the earthquake’s aftermath. They’re still experiencing some strong tremors down there, so let’s continue praying for our Visayan countrymen. There are donation drives–let’s do some good work and help out.

I remember visiting the church of Loay back in 2009. Not as old as Baclayon and Loboc’s (completed around the 1820’s) but definitely unique in its architectural form—I’ve seen nothing like it in the region. The frontage is most interesting. Historian Benjamin Layug describes it having “an inner and an outer three-level portico-facade with semicircular arched main entrance at the first level, rectangular windows on the second level and a low triangular pediment topped by allegorical figures.”

Sadly, the church’s facade completely collapsed last Tuesday.

I can still recall the day I first saw the church of Loay. It rained the entire night (I was staying in Tagbilaran) so I hesitated to go out the next day. But I decided to go that cold morning–visiting Loay and the surrounding towns–all the way to Carmen. Looking back, if I chose not go that day I would’ve  regretted it for the rest of my life because some of the structures I saw then are no longer standing today.

Once in Loay I started walking aimlessly. I  had no clue where this church was. Then I saw this old lady walking alone. Walking so slowly. I thought it a good idea to follow her. Tailing this old lady led me to the steps of Loay’s Church of the Holy Trinity. She must’ve been coming to the church her whole life. I hope she gets to see it rise again.

I took this photo of Loay in 2009. The frontage has collapse because it is the only portion of the church not t supported by buttresses. Basing on the pictures I saw online, around 70% of the church is still in tact. Which gives hope to an eventual restoration.

Advertisements

Prayers For Bohol

When I saw photos of Loon, Baclayon and Loboc churches on line after the massive earthquake earlier I couldn’t help but feel this deep sadness wash over me. Bohol prides itself for having some of the best preserved centuries old churches (I went to see these churches back in 2009). These historical gems are now in shambles. Today is without a doubt one of the worst times for heritage advocates in this country.

In these difficult times, let’s pray for each other. Far more important are those who perished during this tragic natural disaster and their families. Let’s keep them in our thoughts and reach out to them.

Loboc when I saw it in 2009. Believed to be the oldest church in Bohol.


Some Photos of Old Houses in Tagbilaran

Twice I came to Tagbilaran but never wrote anything. I could be lazy at times. While I was looking at some folders containing pictures of Bohol churches I saw the pictures I took of the old houses in Tagbilaran back in 2009.

A rare bahay na bato with tisa roofing. This one is in the area called causeway. There many other extant old houses in a place called Sitio Ubos (the old Parian district during the Spanish era). Its worth the visit.

The roofing of this house has recently been replaced with galvanized sheet. There are several houses (near the bridge to Panglao Island) in this part of Tagbilaran that are well kept.

A beautiful old house where the lower floor is made into a bakery while the upper portion the residence.

Both trips were in ’09. The first was the longest. I spent three days just going around. I went as far as Carmen. Visiting all the significant old towns as I pass by. Even got lost for hours somewhere Duero – thanks to a man (who once work as a security guard in Cubao) who together with his daughter helped me find my way back.  I’ll never forget the Boholanon’s kindness and generosity – especially those have far less than most of us do. They’re such an amazing people.

During the second day of my first visit, leaving Loboc, I was surprised to see Boom Boom Bautista driving his own jeepney (with spray painted logos of “Ala Boxing”). He was very popular there. People were buzzing their horns when they see him, calling him idol. I went on his jeep and had a photo with him taken in Dau Tagbilaran.

My attempt to reach Talibon, the town where President Carlos P. Garcia was born and raised didn’t materialized due to bad weather. Last year, while I was in Iloilo I met a cousin who married a Boholana. They applied for a permit in BFAD to operate a drugstore in Bohol. Since they knew that I’m presently residing in Muntinlupa (where this government office is located) they sought for my assistance. I found out later, when I asked them where to send the documents to, that they’re from Talibon. They’ve extended an invitation for me to visit them when I’m in Bohol. I’m looking forward to making it this time.

Colorful windows of what appears to be a house built post war. What’s nice about some of the old houses in Tagbilaran is that they are being “reused”.

A large brown painted house in downtown Tagbilaran.

The second visit was shorter yet memorable because I crossed from Cebu using the Argao-Loon route. A less popular route to Bohol. I went back to Cebu the next day. Argao and Loon are the closest land point between these two islands. Loon, a Jesuit founded town, was the first to resist American forces during the Philippine-American war. Unfortunately, I did not see the Birhen sa Kasilak (Nuestra Señora de la Luz) on the day of my visit. I headed straight to Tagbilaran because night was fast approaching and I need to find lodging.

On a clear day, standing in Argao, you could clearly see the windows of the houses in Bohol.


Loboc’s Rivercruise

one of the barges

one of the barges

After walking around San Pedro Apostol, I then cross the old bridge of Loboc were some men directs traffic, the bridge can only accommodate single lane traffic, these traffic enforcers also plays an important role in making sure that the bridge would not be overloaded.

The town old bridge

The town old bridge

The Loboc local government has set up a center for tourist near where the barges for the river cruise are, its complete with pasalubong stalls and very clean comfort rooms. I bought a ticket that cost me P350, it includes the ride, the buffet and the on board entertainment – two guys in floral shirts playing old songs.

Traveling alone has its challenges, since the barge has limited tables, I was assigned to a table where a family is already comfortably seated sharing stories over a delicious meal, it was very awkward, I’m not really a social creature so I was uncomfortable being there but I’m sure that the beautiful family felt the same with having someone like me sit in their table.

After stuffing myself with enough food to last me the whole day, I went to the aisle of the barge where I took pictures of the river and its surrounding environs, they say that this place is our version of the Amazon, it runs through the forest of Bohol, this province offers diversity of exotic and superb natural beauty.

The villagers performing tinikling

The villagers performing tinikling

Along the river the barge stopped so the passengers can watch local villagers dance, it was an awesome sight. I’m not a fan of dancing but the folk dance brought back memories of my grade school years when our class performed tinikling. The villagers danced graciously, accompanied by a lively strinng band, the tourist were snapping picture like crazy.

The cruise was very relaxing, as it goes downstream – I felt good that I made this trip considering that I was in a very tight budget, the river cruise was a perfect ending for my Bohol vacation.

Tourist enjoying the riverscene

Tourist enjoying the riverscene

The river of Loboc

The river of Loboc


From Carmen to the Historic Town of Loboc

The Chocolate hills complex has stalls that sell shirts, I bought a small tee (for a kid relative), it has designs of cute little tarsiers which are a major hit with children. From there I went down towards the highway on foot. The habalhabal operators will ask for P4o (or more ), which is a bit too high since from the hiway to the complex is less than 500 meters, its slightly ascending but nothing that can’t be handle. My only expense in the area was the cheap entrance fee (the complex is Government owned) and the cute shirt.

The buses going back to Tagbilaran are few and rare, I don’t know if it was because it was high noon, but I waited for some 30 minutes. When a bus finally came, it was jam packed! So full that I was tempted to ride on top of it, (upon the suggestion of the conductor) but decided not to, I was worried that it might rain (I had my laptop & camera) I joined the rest of the passengers inside.

It was hot and there was hardly space to move, it was far from comfortable but this is how regular folks here commute – I enjoyed the ride. The bus was overloading passengers that when we were entering the steep passages of Bilar a tire went flat!

As the bus descend  to the lowlands, I was already dreaming of the buffet I plan to have in Loboc, while on board the barge that would cruise the river. I was very hungry from all the walking. But before doing the cruise, I decided to walk around Loboc.

The beautiful Church of San Pedro, I found Papal tiara and Jesuit symbols around the church, there was even a Spanish coat of arms near the convent.

The beautiful Church of San Pedro Apostol, I found bas relief's of the Papal tiara, Jesuit symbols and the Spanish coat of arms around the church.

Reaching Loboc I went to see some of the Tarsier’s, I didn’t enjoy this experience, I felt bad about this beautiful animals being caged near the riverside. I just can’t take pictures of this little creatures knowing that their being used just for profits. I should’ve visited the Tarsier sanctuary in Corella but there was not enough time.

I then went to  the poblacion where Loboc’s historic church and where the renowned river cruise starts, there’s an interesting structure here, probably one of the most stupidest tax funded project that I’ve ever seen. I don’t know when it started but some idiot built a bridge headed straight to the church!

I’m sure that Loboc residents fought hard to preserve their church, they succeeded, the project was canceled and it’s a good thing that they did not brought it down. The half finished bridge now stands a reminder of how wasteful and brainless people our leaders can be.

I went to the church and visited its parish museum. Very few people know that Loboc is where the Jesuits moved their mission after the Moro raids in Baclayon, although still maintaining the church there they set up Loboc as their mission center, having it as the mission’s resedencia, making the town one of the most significant town in early Visayan Catholic history.

Loboc is the oldest parish in Bohol, the Jesuit fathers always possessing the desire to educate, founded a boarding school here for boys (making Loboc the first town to be extensively educated by the Spanish Jesuits). It was here that the Loboc natives were introduced to music. Today, Loboc is known for its music culture.

When the church was taken over by the Recollects upon the expulsion of the Jesuits, they renovated the church and built the impressive tower we see today standing.

Padre Alonso de Humanes, considered by many a holy man, who converted natives from Leyte and some other islands is said to have been buried here. I heard from someone that the Jesuit novitiate in Novaliches have the remains of this devoted Friar. Are they the same person? or was the body moved? I would need to ask around and research on this a bit I guess. Here in Loboc, it is said that his grave site use to be a popular pilgrimage, people believe that this man is a saint – with all his labors to propagating the faith and his record of admirable conduct – making him well loved and respected, I believe he must be.

The dome with its beautiful artwork

The dome with its beautiful artwork

The convent, now part museum part residence, is a three storey building. Much of it is unaltered which was truly exceptional, the second floor often serves as a meeting place, kinda like a convention hall. The murals on the ceiling were done by Rey Francia and one Canuto Avila. Other interesting objects in the church are the retablos (from the Jesuits and Recollects) and the bas reliefs. All of which are in excellent condition.

Bas relief

A Bas relief with the symbols of Colonial Spain

The bell tower and the stupid bridge

The bell tower and the discontinued stupid bridge


Choco hills

Not so cholaty. Chocolate hills complex.

Not so cholaty. Chocolate hills complex.

Traveling from Tagbiliaran to Carmen is a long ride but the best part of  the trip is what you see along the way and of course, Carmen, where the chocolate hills can be viewed from an elevated flat form.

I pass by Loboc River and the town’s many interesting sights, their popular river cruise has been featured on TV and print media (something that I would try before going back to Tagbilaran the same day). The river is extensive and wide, it stretches for kilometers, and its clean – villages and jungle sits right beside it, it was a sight to behold, I wonder how life is living next to it.

The fun part of the long trip to Carmen is the scenery (I try not to count hours but savor the moment!) I saw nothing but nature, pure nature especially when the climb  towards the midland started, and it was awesome. When we reached the man made forest, the trees made the sun disappear, the bus had to open its lights inside so that the vehicle would be visible from incoming traffic. The trees here were planted by volunteers decades ago. I’ve never thought that something that looks so natural was a project of men; I guess I’m used to seeing men destroy nature, here they brought it back, and it was a good feeling seeing it.

The road to Carmen and beyond

The road to Carmen and beyond

After the man made forest, we pass by this truck that has plummeted into the ravine, I don’t know if it has been there for some time, I think the driver and his passenger had long been evacuated but the scene reminds people that the road is safe only if people make it safe, the highway have some tricky curves and because it was built on a mountain, some parts of it is drenched with natural forest water. I don’t think I’m skilled enough to drive here, how can someone drive here at night?

I don’t know how long the trip took when we finally reached the poblacion of Bilar, the bus did stop in front of its Mercado, unloading passengers and merchandise, it was the busiest place in Bilar – passing the poblacion one could begin to see some of the Chocolate hills, actually its during summers that these hills becomes brown, making it appear like giant Hershey kisses, but after summer it becomes green and it is now.

My only advice to other nomads commuting to Carmen, always ask for directions, upon boarding the bus in the terminal in Dao inform the conductor or your seatmate or someone who knows that you’re going to Carmen to see the chocolate hills.

I’m often too shy to ask, often just relying on my gut instinct – that’s why I get lost all the time – but I like getting lost, it is when I’m lost that I find myself – moments that I really feel good, it completes the traveler in me, its weird but I’ve always been this way.

I remember when I was a grade school seeing a poster of chocolate hills in our classroom, along with Taal Volacano and Luneta. These images never left my mind, I wonder if public schools still have those scenic posters. I marveled what it was made of, dreaming that it was really chocolates, well it didn’t turn out to be real chocolates but seeing it is one sweet unforgetable experience.

Century old Church of Bilar

Century old Church of Bilar


Simbahan sa Loay

Is built on an elevated plain, when I got to its grounds there were children playing on its basketball court – but even with this activity the barrio had a very relax and quite environment. Coming from the Clarin house I had to climb stairs of a hundred steps. After catching my breath I went straight inside the church, it was perfect time to pray, I was completely alone, not a soul in sight.

The façade is being cemented on the side using hollow blocks but the original facade could still be seen, according to the book Philippine Churches it was finished in 1822 with semicircular arched main entrance at the first level, rectangular windows on the second level and a low triangular pediment topped by allegorical figures of faith, Hope and Charity.

The pulpit has a tornavoz or portavoz which is a sounding board built on top of the pulpito to amplification purposes – necessity is indeed the mother of all invention. Loay was a Recollect mission, and like Baclayon which became theirs, the church is filled with icons of their devotion. These pulpito’s once useful structures are no longer used, seeing it makes me imagine how mass was once like and I’m glad to see that most are left standing.

The ceiling is painted with murals by Ray Francia in 1927; he must’ve been a very busy man since he had several works of this kind all over the island during his days. There is pipe organ which was installed in 1841, I don’t know if it’s still working but this musical instrument definitely needs some restoration.

The octagonal bell is just a few feet away from the church, unlike other bell towers this one have a domed roof. What was previously a convent is now a beautiful school; the Holy Trinity Academy was founded in the mid 1950’s.

The Church of the Holy Trinity is about 18 kilometers from Tagbilaran.

Loay church

Loay church

Bas Relief that can be found in the bell tower

Bas Relief that can be found in the bell tower

An example of a good restoration job, while the roofing was upgraded, the original building was left untouched, preserving its architectural integrity

An example of a good restoration job, while the roofing was upgraded, the original building was left untouched, preserving its architectural integrity


Albuquerque!

I took this picture of Albuquerque church while I was inside the bus, I regret not having time to explore it, but if you have time after your visit to Baclayon, try going here, it’s only a 10 minute ride from Baclayon. Its bell tower is of Moorish design and one could see the Pasadizo, a short bridge that connects the church to the convent, they say it can only be found here but this I’m sure, it precedes our modern day overpasses!

I took this picture of Albuquerque's Sta. Monica churhc, while I was inside the bus, I was headed to Carmen, I regret not having time to explore it, but if you have time after your visit to Baclayon, try going here, it’s only a 10 minute ride from Baclayon. Its bell tower is of unique Moorish design and one could see the Pasadizo, a short bridge that connects the church to the convent, they say it can only be found here but this I’m sure, it precedes our modern day overpasses!


Casa Clarin in Loay

After Baclayon, I decided to visit another place I’ve read about, Casa Clarin in Loay. The Clarin’s were known for their political roles during the American years, I would not be surprised some of them are still politicos.

The house was built in 1840, an NHI marker stands in front of it, and it’s superbly preserved. I took a look inside the house and it was as if the prominent family still lives there, everything was in order. It houses the family’s antique’s which are mostly American era objects.

The ancestral house is in very good condition I think, structurally it  feels sound, my only worry was that its susceptible to fire, the roof is covered in nipa and the entire house is made of wood. There were indications of anay presence; hopefully they get controlled before they extend their damage.

The garden is now a restaurant, Café Olegario. Bea Zobel was a guest of honor when it opened, it’s a quite area where people can enjoy Loayan delicacies and Boholano style cooking – but I immediately made an exit when I found out how much a meal would cost me (I only have my pamasaje with me) but I’m sure most tourist can enjoy their meals in the cafe, the place and the food is worth it.

I was looking for someone to take my picture outside the house when I found a boy – who never shied away, he was a gamer! I had to teach him how to focus the camera and shoot, it took some time, some of the people passing by was laughing because the boy can’t seem to make it work which was really funny, he finally did – you be the judge if the boy have future in photo journalism.

I was looking for someone to take my picture outside the house when I found a boy – who never shied away, he was a gamer! I had to teach him how to focus the camera and shoot, it took some time, the people passing by was having a good laugh, because the boy can’t seem to make it work which was really funny, he finally did, children are fast learners and this one is – you be the judge if the boy have future in photo journalism.


The Heart of Baclayon

The mission of Baclayon was established by two Jesuits Juan de Torres and Gabriel Sanchez who arrived in Bohol on 17 November 1596. They came from Cebu. Torres reports that he could not find a decent place to celebrate Mass, there wasnt even a servicable table in the dwelling they stayed in. The Jesuit convinced the inhabitants to build a church, which they accomplished in no time. This was most likely a bamboo and thatch church.  Baclayon served at one time as the residentia or center of the Bohol missions, where the superior resided. Baclayon was one of two towns that did not join the Diwata revolt (1621), remaining steadfast in the Christian faith.  Despite claims that the present stone church in Baclayon is the oldest in the Philippines, evidence places the construction of the church to 1727. The belief that the church was built in 1595 may have come because of a 19th century report by the Recollects that the mission was founded in 1595; but the same report lists two other dates 1593 and 1594. The date 1595 inscribed on the church façade is a later addition.  The adjoining but separate tower may have been started by the Jesuits, but it was completed during the administration of the Recollects, ca. 1777 as a stone inscription on the tower indicates. The inscription was recently defaced. The church complex was fortified with a wall built by the Jesuits. The walls coral stones were used by the Recollects when they built a new wing of the convento in 1872.

The mission of Baclayon was established by two Jesuits Juan de Torres and Gabriel Sanchez who arrived in Bohol on 17 November 1596. They came from Cebu. Torres reports that he could not find a decent place to celebrate Mass, there wasn't even a servicable table in the dwelling they stayed in. The Jesuit convinced the inhabitants to build a church, which they accomplished in no time. This was most likely a bamboo and thatch church. Baclayon served at one time as the residentia or center of the Bohol missions, where the superior resided. Baclayon was one of two towns that did not join the Diwata revolt (1621), remaining steadfast in the Christian faith. Despite claims that the present stone church in Baclayon is the oldest in the Philippines, evidence places the construction of the church to 1727. The belief that the church was built in 1595 may have come because of a 19th century report by the Recollects that the mission was founded in 1595; but the same report lists two other dates 1593 and 1594. The date 1595 inscribed on the church façade is a later addition. The adjoining but separate tower may have been started by the Jesuits, but it was completed during the administration of the Recollects, ca. 1777 as a stone inscription on the tower indicates. The inscription was recently defaced. The church complex was fortified with a wall built by the Jesuits. The walls' coral stones were used by the Recollects when they built a new wing of the convento in 1872.

This church is source of local pride and unity among Baclayanons, as the lady tour guide in the parish museum told her visitors, “Baclayon church is our heart”, for them it’s not only the symbol of religious unity among the Catholic residents, it stands for their way of life, traditions passed down through the years.

Writers from past and present wrote about its timeless beauty. I like the church’s simplicity and elegance, its massive bell tower is an imposing structure – I’ve never seen nothing like it before.

The Retablo’s have icons of Recollect devotion, but the Jesuit’s, who erected the church, the convent and the bell tower left their familiar motto, Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam, in the main altar, proof of their hard pioneering labor establishing Baclayon.

The museo is full of relics! The museo, once the convento is in itself a monument of the town’s glorious past. It defies the elements as it continues to serve its visitors and residents.

The painting in the ceiling was a recent addition, sometime 1980’s if I’m not mistaken, some scholars believes that the artwork is out of place.

I appreciate the restoration so much – hardly anything was changed, it’s a great example that old structures with historic value need not be upgraded or beautified or rebuilt, it just needs little care and attention that’s all.

Viva La Parroquia la Purisima Concepcion de Maria!


Finally Baclayon

You must be thinking, thats a great shot, who took it?, but this are all for show, after this back pose shots Ill go back and get my camera and there were many occasions that the people around would look at me with what an idiot! look in their faces!

You must be thinking, "that's a great shot, Arnaldo, who took it?", well I took the liberty of taking my own picture, lets call it self portrait, this are all for show, yes, after these dramatic "back pose" shots I'll go back and get my tripod & camera and there were many occasions that the people around would look at me with "what an idiot!" look in their faces!


Around Tagbilaran

I left my house at around 4am Saturday, headed straight to Pier 3 – where a Supercat (Catamaran model) regularly transport people from Cebu to Tagbilaran. It was there that I realized that I was too early for the trip, I was told by a porter in the pier that the earliest ship bound to Bohol is in Pier 1 but I decided to stick with these popular ferries.

At the port there were several of these children that will dive for money that gets thrown in the water

At the port there were several of these children that will dive for money that gets thrown in the water

The Supercat was on the dot. Once boarded, it left the port and was in Tagbilaran pass 10. At the Tagbilarn port, I observed the crystal clear water; I don’t know its depth  but it so clear that you could see the sands and the fishes underneath. It is true that Bohol remains as one of the cleanest provinces in the country. I then flagged a tricycle and contracted the driver to bring me to three places in Tagbilaran, before going here I had already planned everything, my list is long and I only have two days to complete this excursion.

The Cathedral of St. Joseph the Worker which becomes an eye-catching well lighted place during the night time

The Cathedral of St. Joseph the Worker

One of the original bells brought down from the tower, exposed to all the elements while its on display just outside the Cathdral

One of the original bells brought down from the tower, exposed to all the elements while its on display just outside the Cathdral

The province being one of the first to be Christianized offers a great deal of treasures for heritage tourist. The construction of churches and convents was a community task, referred to as polo y servicio. Often mistaken as a form of forced labor, most of the labor rendered was essentially acts of Filipino religiosity and that the majority Boholano’s has remained faithful to their Catholic devotion is a tribute to the tradition their ancestors had practiced.

I first visited Bohol’s Cathedral, built to honor St. Joseph the worker, it was first built in 1787 and was burned to in 1798 (along with its convent). In 1839, Fray Valero de San Sebastian rebuilt the church; it took him 16 years to finish. The Cathedral’s bell tower is very impressive, it has 6 bells – with embossed dates, interesting is that the bells does not have similar years. This could only be explained by the years it took to complete the tower which was headed by the Recollect Fray Jose Sanchez. A certain Fray Enciso added iron cornices, chandeliers and tisa roofing in 1884 – 1894.

The Cathedral is among the first six churches built by the true pioneers of the Bohol territory, the Jesuits – all their church and properties were given to the Recollect when the black robes were expelled. This Neo-Romanesque church is one of the finest churches in Central Visayas, it has stood the test of time for centuries but in 1950 its coral stone facade were covered by cement and renovations afterwards has altered some of its most beautiful original materials.

One of the oldest casa in Tagbilaran

One of the oldest casa in Tagbilaran

An interesting casa which is said to have been made in the late 1800s

An interesting casa which is said to have been made in the late 1800's

After the Cathedral I went to the old houses near Tagbilaran causeway, this area is the original Tagbilaran here one could find the villas of the rich Tagbilaran residents. In Sitio Ubos one could Casa Rocha, it was closed when I got there but all over the quarter I found houses that give the area a Filipino character, the houses were built in style that united Hispanic inspiration and Filipino ingenuity. What’s truly amazing is that the casa’s architectural integrity has remained whole for centuries.

Plaza Principe across is the park and the Cathedral

Plaza Principe across is the park and the Cathedral, shown here being repainted

An interesting house right beside the Museo

An interesting old house right beside the Museo

Just in front of the Cathedral is the provincial capitol building which was before as Plaza del Principe founded in 1860. On its left is Bohol Museum, formerly the province library it was an old school during the Spanish era called Escuela La Nina.

Legaspi and his new friend

Legaspi and his new friend

Next stop was the blood compact site, the symbolism of this act has signified a coming together of what would later become known as the Filipinos and the conquering Imperialist Spain. What’s wrong about the monument is that it was more like an inuman, tagayan as one tourist perkily suggested. The artist, the great Boholano sculptor Napoleon Abueva, was not informed that Legaspi and the famed Bojolano chieftain drew blood from their chest to mark  their accord. The depiction of the ala-KKK wrist cut is untrue as Legazpi’s letter would reveal. The other fact is that Loay is the site of Pacto de Sangre.

After the Sandugo site, I intended to go to Panglao island – known for its white sand beaches to many tourist, I planned to visit the churches of Panglao and Dauis as they have been known to have marvelous architectural style, unfortunately heavy rains prevented me to do so, I tried to let it pass but it continued till night time. I had to skip the two sites I long wanted to see, specially Dauis’ Assumption of our Lady for  its miraculous well inside the church said to have sprung miraculously, its located at the foot of the altar.

Supercat: Pier 3 Schedule

Cebu – Tagbilaran 830, 0030 & 1630

Tagbilaran – Cebu 1030, 1430 & 1830

*27 June 2009


%d bloggers like this: